Dec 06, 2021  
College Catalog 2019-2020 
    
College Catalog 2019-2020 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

All Courses


 

Juilliard Colloquium

  
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    JUILL 101 — Juilliard Colloquium

    1 credit
    Fall
    Faculty

    Juilliard Colloquium is a one-semester course taught by an interdisciplinary team of faculty, staff, and advanced students. The curriculum is designed to promote an awareness of the skills and tools necessary for building a fulfilling career, not only as performing artists, but also as global citizens and advocates for the arts. This course introduces students to the values and diversity of the Juilliard community, and is intended to provide a foundation that will serve them well beyond their years at the School. Small group discussions and large group activities. Mandatory attendance at designated performances. Required of all first-time college students in Dance, Drama, and Music.
  
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    JUILL 102 — Essentials of Entrepreneurship in the Arts

    1 credit
    Spring
    Barrett Hipes

    Essentials of Entrepreneurship in the Arts is a half-semester course intended to make Juilliard students aware of the abundance of ways in which they can make a unique impact on their art form while at Juilliard and beyond. Guest artists, entrepreneurs, and business leaders will present weekly interactive lectures, introducing students to the fundamentals of project planning, budgets, grant applications, and more. The course will culminate in each student’s preparation and submission of an individual project proposal. Online resources and assessments will also be included.

Dance Technique

  
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    DANCE B100 — Foundations of Ballet I

    1 credit
    Full Year
    Faculty

    Required for all first year dance students, this weekly class explores fundamentals of ballet technique that can be applied to a dancers’ work in other ballet classes throughout the week (2 semesters).

  
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    DANCE B101-2 — Ballet (5 levels)

    3 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty

    A graded study of the exercises and vocabulary of the classical technique with a strong emphasis on placement, alignment, coordination, and movement quality. Ballet is a required course for all dancers in every semester of the program (8 semesters).

  
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    DANCE B103M-W — Ballet Technique (3 levels)

    3 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty

    A deeper study of classical technique.  Ballet technique is a required course for all dancers in every semester of the program (8 semesters).

  
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    DANCE B200 — Foundations of Ballet II

    1 credit
    Full Year
    Faculty

    Required for all second year dance students, this weekly class is a continued exploration of fundamentals of ballet technique that can be applied to a dancers’ work in other ballet classes throughout the week (2 semesters).

  
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    DANCE M101-2 — Modern I- Limon

    3 credits
    Full Year
    Risa Steinberg

    A foundational study of the modern dance technique developed by 20th-century master José Limón.  Required of all first year dance students (2 semesters).

  
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    DANCE M103-4 — Modern I- Graham

    3 credits
    Full Year
    Terese Capucilli

    A foundational study of the modern dance technique developed by 20th-century master Martha Graham.  Required of all first year dance students (2 semesters).

  
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    DANCE M201-2 — Modern II - Graham

    3 credits
    Full Year
    Terese Capucilli

    A continued study of the modern dance technique developed by 20th-century master Martha Graham.  Required of all second year dance students (2 semesters).

  
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    DANCE M203 — Modern II - Taylor

    1.5
    Fall
    Linda Kent

    A foundational study of the modern dance style and repertoire of master choreographer Paul Taylor.  Required of all second year dance students (1 semester).
  
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    DANCE M204 — Modern II - Topics

    1.5 credits
    Spring
    Linda Kent and Paul Singh

    A continued study of the modern dance style and repertoire of master choreographer Paul Taylor, and an introduction to floor work.  Required of all second year dance students (1 semester).

  
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    DANCE M301-2 — Modern III - Cunningham

    3 credits
    Full Year
    Jean Freebury

    A foundational study of the modern dance technique developed by 20th-century master Merce Cunningham.  Required of all third year dance students (2 semesters).

  
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    DANCE M303 — Modern III - Limon

    1.5 credits
    Fall
    Risa Steinberg

    A continued study of the modern dance technique developed by 20th-century master José Limón.  Required of all third year dance students (1 semester).

  
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    DANCE M304 — Modern III - Topics

    1.5 credits
    Spring
    Risa Steinberg and Milton Myers

    A continued study of the modern dance techniques of the 20th century and introduction of new techniques in this constantly developing art form.  Topics will rotate and may include study of Limón, Horton, Gaga, floorwork, improvisation, or other styles and techniques.  Required of all third year dance students (1 semester).

  
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    DANCE M401-2 — Modern IV - Horton

    3 credits
    Full Year
    Milton Myers

    A foundational study of the modern dance technique developed by 20th-century master Lester Horton.  Required of all fourth year dance students (2 semesters).

  
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    DANCE M403 — Modern IV -Gaga

    1.5 credits
    Fall
    Bobbi Smith

    An exploration of the movement language developed by Ohad Naharin.  Required of all fourth year dance students (1 semester).

  
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    DANCE P101-2 — Partnering I

    2 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty

    A progressive partnering coursework that encompasses the wide range of styles demanded by today’s choreographers.  Classes may include basic partnering concepts, classical ballet partnering, contemporary partnering, contact improvisation, and repertoire.  Partnering is a required course for all dancers in every semester of the program (8 semesters).

  
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    DANCE P201-2 — Partnering II

    2 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty

    A progressive partnering coursework that encompasses the wide range of styles demanded by today’s choreographers.  Classes may include basic partnering concepts, classical ballet partnering, contemporary partnering, contact improvisation, and repertoire.  Partnering is a required course for all dancers in every semester of the program (8 semesters).

  
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    DANCE P301 — Partnering III

    1 credits
    Fall
    Faculty

    A progressive partnering coursework that encompasses the wide range of styles demanded by today’s choreographers.  Classes may include basic partnering concepts, classical ballet partnering, contemporary partnering, contact improvisation, and repertoire.  Partnering is a required course for all dancers in every semester of the program (8 semesters).

  
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    DANCE P302 — Partnering III - Contact Improv

    1 credit
    Fall
  
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    DANCE P401-2 — Partnering IV

    2 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty

    A progressive partnering coursework that encompasses the wide range of styles demanded by today’s choreographers.  Classes may include basic partnering concepts, classical ballet partnering, contemporary partnering, contact improvisation, and repertoire.  Partnering is a required course for all dancers in every semester of the program (8 semesters).

  
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    DANCE 101-2 — Topics in Dance (4 levels)

    1 credit
    Fall or Spring
    Faculty and Guests

    DANCE 101-2, 201-2, 301-2, 401-2

    As required, may be repeated

    A weekly class that explores various topics in dance, and may include guest instructors.  Topics will rotate throughout the four-year program, to meet the ever-evolving training and educational needs of the 21st-century dancer.  Examples of topics include improvisation/movement creation, somatics, nutrition, and master classes with guest artists.

  
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    DANCE 151 — Hip-hop Foundations

    1 credit
    Spring
    Valerie Ho

    An Introduction to the basic elements, technique, and history of Hip-hop dance.

Dance Performance and Repertory

  
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    DANCE 201 — Topics in Dance

    1 credit
    Fall
    Ronald K. Brown and dance artists from Evidence

  
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    DANCE 301-2 — Topics in Dance

    2 credits
    Spring
    Bobbi Jene Smith, Paul Singh and guests

  
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    DSDAN 101-2 — Repertory, Collaborations, Performance I

    6 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty and Guests

    Rehearsal skills and artistry are developed through the study of repertory and participation in choreographic collaborations with house and guest choreographers. Most of these collaborations culminate in performance. Required for all first-year dance students.
  
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    DSDAN 161-2 — Elements of Performing

    2 credits
    Full Year
    Risa Steinberg

    A study to develop the performer’s powers of projection. The course emphasizes the differences between simply displaying movement and communicating it to an audience. The building of concentration, awareness of stylistic differences, and the establishment of professional rehearsal behavior are developed. Required for all first-year dance students.
  
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    DSDAN 201-2 — Repertory, Collaborations, Performance II

    6 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty and Guests

    Rehearsal skills and artistry are developed through the study of repertory and participation in choreographic collaborations with house and guest choreographers. Most of these collaborations culminate in performance. Required for all second-year dance students.
  
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    DSDAN 261 — Second-year Seminar

    .5 credit
    7 weeks, Spring
    Janis Brenner

    For students in the second year of training, an exploration of movement and music improvisation.
  
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    DSDAN 301-2 — Repertory, Collaborations, Performance III

    6 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty and Guests

    Rehearsal skills and artistry are developed through the study of repertory and participation in choreographic collaborations with house and guest choreographers. Most of these collaborations culminate in performance. Required for all third-year dance students.
  
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    DSDAN 401-2 — Repertory, Collaborations, Performance IV

    6 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty and Guests

    Rehearsal skills and artistry are developed through the study of repertory and participation in choreographic collaborations with guest choreographers. Most of these collaborations culminate in performance. Required for all fourth-year dance students.

Dance Studies

  
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    DSDAN 100 — Alexander Technique

    1 credit
    Fall or Spring
    Jane Kosminsky

    A method of improving the dancer’s technique from plies and extensions to jumps, leaps, and turns through concentration on movement habits. Emphasizes the efficient use of the neck, head, and torso relationship, thereby providing a stress-reducing process that can be used during class performance and rest. Required for first-year students.
  
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    DSDAN 110 — Pilates Mat

    1 credit
    Spring
    Faculty

  
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    DSDAN 111-2 — Dance Composition I

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Rosalind Newman

    Movement experiences in imagery and design develop the dancer’s creative imagination. Students begin to discover how a dance is made through the process of choreographing short dance studies. Required for all first-year dance students.
  
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    DSDAN 131 — Dance History I

    3 credits
    Fall
    Faculty

    The first part of a two-semester survey of the dancer’s heritage covering periods and styles of dance, choreographers, and selected dance masterworks. Comparisons are drawn between dance and other arts in the same era. Required for all second year dance students.

     

     

  
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    DSDAN 132 — Dance History II

    3 credits
    Spring
    Faculty

    Prerequisite: DSDAN 131 . The second part of a two-semester survey of the dancer’s heritage covering periods and styles of dance, choreographers, and selected dance masterworks. Comparisons are drawn between dance and other arts in the same era. Required for all second-year dance students.
  
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    DSDAN 211-2 — Dance Composition II

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Hilary Easton and Jerome Begin

  
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    DSDAN 351-2 — Anatomy/Kinesiology

    6 credits
    Full Year
    Irene Dowd

    A detailed kinesthetic exploration of skeletal joint mechanics and the muscles that produce motion of those joints. Students will examine movement strategies to enhance stability, control, and articulation while developing musculo-skeletal problem-solving skills applicable to dance. Required for all third-year dance students.
  
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    DSDAN 431-2 — Acting for Dancers

    1 credit per semester
    Fall and Spring
    Richard Feldman

    Studies to expand the performance capabilities of the dancer through an exploration of basic acting exercises, improvisations, and simple scenes, with particular emphasis on spontaneity and the transmission of impulse to verbal expression. Required for all fourth-year dance students.
  
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    DSDAN 461 — Pedagogy

    1 credit
    Fall
    Hilary Easton, Juilliard Dance faculty, and Director of Global K-12 Dance Programs, with special guests


Music Studies for Dance

  
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    THMUS 111-2D — Music Studies I for Dancers

    6 credits
    Full Year
    Thomas Cabaniss

    An overview of the fundamentals of music theory and musical architecture, including rhythm, meter, texture, counterpoint, and formal structure. Introduction to musical instruments and diverse repertoire. Development of basic skills in score analysis, musicianship, and sight singing; project-based work in musical creativity in each semester. Required for all first-year dance students.

     

  
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    THMUS 211-2D — Music Studies II for Dancers

    4.5 credits
    Full Year
    Jerome Begin

    Prerequisite: THMUS 111-2D . Builds upon the skills and concepts explored in Music Studies I, with a strong focus on the interrelation of music and dance, incorporating the following: developing a sophisticated vocabulary with which to speak about and collaborate with music; in-depth rhythmic training; a survey of classical music history with a strong focus on the 20th and 21st centuries; listening to and analyzing musical works in a variety of genres in a way that is relevant and meaningful to dancers; developing musicality in dance by integrating musical concepts discussed in class into the dancer’s technical practice. Required for all second year dance students.

Stagecraft and Production for Dance

  
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    DSDAN 341-2 — Stagecraft

    2 credits
    Full Year
    Leslie Smith

    Study and practice in elements of theater production. Laboratory work, with practical application in producing a dance concert. Required for all third-year dance students.
  
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    DSDAN 441-2 — Senior Production

    2 credits
    Full Year
    Risa Steinberg

    A continuation of study and practice in elements of theater production. A full production is planned, budgeted, and presented. Required for all fourth-year dance students.
  
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    DSDAN 471-2 — Seminar for Seniors

    2 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty and Guests

    For students about to begin professional work. The seminar offers a survey of the field, its diversity, opportunities, and requirements; and objective self-evaluation, including planning for graduation examination and for professional auditions. Studies in criticism and aesthetics develop an informed and individual point of view. Required for all fourth-year dance students.

Dance Electives

  
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    DSDAN E100 — Alexander Technique

    1 credit
    Fall or Spring
    Jane Kosminsky

    May be repeated

    An optional continued study of the Alexander Technique for dancers.Individual sessions meet bi-weekly with instructor during lunch break or on Saturday mornings.Open to 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Year dance students.

  
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    DSDAN E111-2 — Voice for Dancers

    1 credit per semester
    Full Year
    Badiene Magaziner

    May be repeated

    A basic course in singing in preparation for musical theater auditions. By audition only.  Open to 3rd & 4th Year dance students; class size is limited to 8 students.

  
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    DSDAN E124 — Hip-hop

    1 credit
    Spring
    Valerie Ho

    May be repeated

    A deeper exploration of the elements, technique, and history of Hip-hop dance.

  
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    DSDAN E125-6 — Yoga

    1 credit
    Fall and Spring
    Francisco Martinez



    An introduction to and exploration of the basic elements of restorative yoga. May be repeated

  
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    DSDAN E127 — Mindfulness

    1 credit
    Fall
    Francisco Martinez

    An introduction to techniques used to achieve a mental state of focus on one’s awareness in the present moment, while calmly acknowledging and accepting one’s feelings, thoughts, and bodily sensations.  May incorporate elements of yoga and meditation.
  
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    DSDAN E131-2 — Tap (3 Levels)

    1 credit per semester
    Fall and Spring
    Ray Hesselink

    Basic tap, directed toward auditioning successfully for musical theater, films, and videos.  Intermediate and Advanced level classes are offered off-site at STEPS on Broadway (taught by Mr. Hesselink and open to professionals in the NYC dance community).

  
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    DSDAN E281 — Solo and Duet Repertory

    1 credit
    Fall
    Faculty and Guests

    Offered in the third and fourth years. Limited enrollment.
  
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    DSDAN E391 — Dance Composition III: Technology, New Media, and Multi-Arts Integration

    3 credits
    Fall
    Art Bridgman, Myrna Packer, and Yara Travieso

  
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    DSDAN E410 — Senior Production Choreography

    1 credit
    Spring
    Risa Steinberg

    Open to a limited number of students at the discretion of a faculty committee. This course asks aspiring choreographers to challenge themselves to create works of greater depth and complexity than seen before. These choreographers are expected to create works for the Senior Production Performance week.
  
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    DSDAN E470 — Choreographers and Composers

    2 credits
    Fall
    Jerome Begin, Janis Brenner, and Daniel Ott

    Prerequisite: Dance Composition I  and Dance Composition II  recommended. A practicum in collaborative art that will explore techniques of working together through exercises in problem-solving and the development of a work. The course will introduce to each discipline the needs, vocabulary, and work methods of the other and search for the common ground on which each can flourish while nourishing the other. Advisement will be provided for ongoing showings of works in progress. Finished pieces will be presented in concert format. For selected choreographers in the third year and Composition majors only.

Drama Undergraduate Studies: Acting

  
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    DRAMA 1013 — Ballroom Dancing

    0.5 credits
    Fall
    Steven Dougherty

    Ballroom dancing engages the actor to explore the ways in which people move through their lives physically and psychologically. Each dance has a different point of view and tells a different story. This first semester class focuses on increasing muscle memory, as well as on physical and mental presence. The work practices ceremony, grace, body-mind connection, sportsmanship and the equal importance of leading and following. The work culminates in a formal ballroom competition including well-known and highly respected judges and master-of-ceremonies from the professional ballroom world.
  
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    DRAMA 1014 — Improvisation

    3 credits
    Fall
    Richard Feldman

    Through a broad spectrum of improvisatory exercises, this course aims to free students from self-consciousness, fear, and pretense; to enhance their powers for concentration; to foster a full awareness and control of their inner resources; to expand the imagination and to encourage expression, interaction, and temperament.
  
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    DRAMA 1016 — Play

    1 credit
    Fall
    Jesse Perez

  
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    DRAMA 1024 — Scene Study I

    3 credits
    Spring
    Richard Feldman

    This spring semester course builds upon the work of the Improvisation classes and aims to further free students from self-consciousness as they explore the initial stages of work on scenes.
  
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    DRAMA 1025 — Masks

    1 credit
    Spring
    Kathleen McNenny

    In the second semester, the work on neutral mask is designed to free the student from self-consciousness and to release imaginative impulses leading to uninhibited physical expression, together with economy of gesture. The neutral mask removes reliance on voice or facial expression to communicate and shifts the actor’s focus onto and into the body. This change of physical identity breaks down inhibitions and serves not only to release the student’s imaginative capacity for transformation, but to prepare the way for equally courageous characterization without a mask.
  
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    DRAMA 1031-41 — Alexander Technique I

    2 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Charlotte Okie

    A mind-body method for becoming aware of and changing movement habits. Focus is on the development of awareness of oneself in movement — to recognize and learn how to release excess tension and to change those habits of movement which interfere with the free and centered use of the body.
  
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    DRAMA 1032-42 — Fundamentals of Movement

    2 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Mark Olsen

    In the first semester, students focus on development of creative and effective relationships to space, time, gravity, behavior, energy, imagery, music, breath, and text. The work is impulse-driven, dynamic, and grounded in full use of the imagination. The second semester is a laboratory of work focused on the introduction of Laban effort-shaping and the practical exploration of all aspects of gesture, including graphic, emotional, unconscious, and theatrical. There is a partial emphasis on eradicating gestural habits and providing a process of expanding gestural vocabulary. Working in all magnitudes, staying grounded in emotional truth.
  
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    DRAMA 1034-44 — Movement I - Getting into Condition

    2 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Darryl Quinton

    A class designed to increase the physical range of the student through stretching, flexibility, and strengthening exercises. Emphasis is placed on rhythm, phrasing, dynamic, intent, and moving in space. The class integrates principles of the Alexander Technique.
  
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    DRAMA 1035-45 — Music Studies

    2 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Michelle DiBucci

    An introduction to a wide spectrum of musical styles and compositional devices with emphasis on listening to and speaking about music and its connection to all of the arts. The first semester concentrates on key elements of music including melody, rhythm, harmony, form, texture and timbre. Actors will have the opportunity to engage with music students and outside musical guests. The second semester includes work on contemporary song forms, opera, and the origins of African-American music.
  
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    DRAMA 1037-47 — Speech I - Foundation and Practice

    2 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Deborah Hecht

    The course focuses on a wide palette of sounds for use with a range of characters, plays, and venues, including film. Focus is on the muscular development of the speech organs for flexibility, strength, precision, and varying shapes. Actors develop a more sensitive ear for sound and variations in sounds, as well as a connection to and appreciation of the onomatopoeia of language and its direct application to text. Students identify and explore the formation of vowels and consonants of spoken English using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) as written reinforcement of muscular, auditory, and linguistic awareness. Students work individually and in small groups with their teachers. Application and evaluation involve physical and vocal exercises, text memorization, phonetic transcription, and landmark recorded passages.
  
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    DRAMA 1039-49 — Voice I - Foundation and Practice

    2 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Kate Wilson

    The course focuses on the principles and practice of respiration, phonation, resonance, and articulation. Anatomy, physiology, and the physics of sound are introduced as students explore exercises for relaxation, flexibility, capacity, breath control, placement, and the production of sound. Through poetry and prose, actors use sound to reveal imagery, dynamics, and rhetoric in poetry and prose.
  
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    DRAMA 1043 — Stage Combat

    1 credit
    Fall and Spring
    Mark Olsen

    In the second quarter, students engage in practical study of the essential ingredients of safe, effective, well-acted stage fights: partnering, attacks, defense, falls, chokes, rolls, and the contributions of the actor to the process of creating and managing comic or dramatic stage fights. In the second term, swordplay will be introduced.
  
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    DRAMA 2014-24 — Scene Study II

    6 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Rebecca Guy, Evan Yionoulis

    The discovery and development of imaginative and technical skills which, together with the skills acquired in the first year, will enable the student to discern the inner world of a play and to learn to transform into a living character within it.

    Please note: Evan Yionoulis will teach the course in the fall semester, and Rebecca Guy will teach the course in the spring semester. 

  
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    DRAMA 2015-25 — Masks II

    2 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Kathleen McNenny

    The mask is a powerful tool that enables actors to free their instincts, impulses, and imagination. Both character and animal masks are used to expand what the actor is capable of. The work demands that the actor fill the mask physically, vocally, emotionally, and psychologically, in order to embody the life of the character. Mask work serves not only to release the student’s imaginative capacity for transformation, but to prepare the way for equally courageous characterization without a mask.
  
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    DRAMA 2031-41 — Alexander Technique II

    2 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Carolyn Serota

    A continuation of the first year’s exploration into self-awareness with increasing emphasis on application of the technique to the actor’s creative process, character transformation, and performance skills.
  
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    DRAMA 2034-44 — Movement II

    2 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Moni Yakim

    A rigorous drill to increase stamina and the capacity for endurance; to develop physical coordination and naturalness; to coordinate movement with breath; to attain uninhibited physical expression through connection with inner rhythms, instincts, and emotions; to explore physical character transformations.
  
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    DRAMA 2034A — Movement in Context

    1 credit
    Fall
    Mark Olsen

    A first-semester course involving study aimed at linking physical vocabulary to music, objects, culture, historical periods, gender, and theatrical styles. The learning incorporates the study of the full spectrum of movement from natural to un-natural, minimal to epic, controlled to full abandon, rustic to royal, low stakes to high stakes, etc. There will be occasional use of text.
  
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    DRAMA 2036-46 — Singing

    2 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Deborah Lapidus, David Gaines

    This course is designed to help the actor release their voice and find deeper expressivity and truth through singing. Emphasis on basic singing techniques and breath, extending vocal range through group singing, madrigals, chorales, and duets as well as individual songs.
  
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    DRAMA 2037-47 — Speech II - Application and Expansion

    1.5 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Dwight Bacquie, Deborah Hecht

    Work includes further attention to strength, precision, and consistency, and delves into more complex aspects of spoken language, which are then applied to more complex texts. Students work individually and in small groups with their teachers. Evaluation is based on group and individual assignments which include Shakespeare and contemporary monologues.

    Please note: Deborah Hecht will teach in the fall semester, and Dwight Bacquie will teach the course in the spring semester. 

  
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    DRAMA 2039-49 — Voice II - Application and Expansion

    2 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Kate Wilson

    Work focuses on increased physical awareness and expansion, with exercises for breath capacity, initiation of sound, resonance, and size. Exercises to expand the range of expression are explored. Support, flexibility, vocal dynamic, and character are challenged through a wide variety of texts.
  
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    DRAMA 3014-24 — Scene Study III

    6 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Faculty and Guests

    An integration of the technical, imaginative, and personal discoveries of the preceding two years through scene and exercise work, leading to meeting the demands of works with heightened text.
  
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    DRAMA 3031-41 — Alexander Technique III

    2 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Carolyn Serota

    Individual and/or group sessions to refine the use of tools learned in the first and second years and their application both on and off the stage.
  
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    DRAMA 3033 — Makeup Techniques for Performance

    1 credit
    Fall
    Sarah Cimino

    Through the first semester, students learn basic makeup (including street makeup for women), corrective makeup, and character makeup, including the use of wigs (and facial hair), as well as prosthetics. The class is largely a practical workshop and includes the assembling of personal makeup kits suited to individual requirements. It also addresses makeup for on-camera work and self-taping.
  
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    DRAMA 3034-44 — Movement III

    1.5 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Moni Yakim

    A physical acting lab focusing on the development and enrichment of a physically expressive vocabulary using texts and individual imaginative resources. Using exercises and skills learned during the first and second years, students will structure a warm-up routine and continue with exercises that enable a strong connection with both a partner and the group.
  
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    DRAMA 3036 — Singing for Performance

    1 credit
    Fall
    Deborah Lapidus, David Gaines

    Focus on individual and group coaching geared to each actor based on performance, audition, or personal need.
  
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    DRAMA 3038 — Suzuki

    1 credit
    Fall
    Ellen Lauren

    Developed by internationally-acclaimed director Tadashi Suzuki, the Suzuki Training Method is a rigorous physical discipline drawn from such diverse influences as ballet, traditional Greek and Japanese theater, and martial arts. The training seeks to heighten the actor’s emotional and physical power and commitment to each moment on stage. Attention is on the lower body and a vocabulary of footwork, sharpening an actor’s breath control and concentration.
  
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    DRAMA 3039-49 — Voice III - Synthesis and Transformation

    2 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Andrew Wade, Kate Wilson

    This course focuses on vocal transformation through a seamless synthesis of skills including rhetoric, stamina, and vocal characterization. Work in vocal dynamics further explores heightened expressivity, style, and transformation. Students work individually and in small groups with their teachers. Material includes political speeches, classic and contemporary texts.

    Please note: Kate Wilson will teach the course in the fall semester, and Andrew Wade will teach the course in the spring semester. 

  
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    DRAMA 3042 — Character in Motion

    1 credit
    Spring
    Mark Olsen

    This second-semester class involves a series of assignments in character exploration and development. Etudes include “memorable character,” “invented character,” “observed character,” “opposite character,” “archetypes,” “culturally bound,” etc. All character studies are aimed at development of strong point of view in solo and relational forms of expression.
  
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    DRAMA 3045 — Acting on Camera I

    2 credits
    Fall
    Bob Krakower

    The purpose of studying on-camera acting is to take the skills the actors have learned in their theatre classes and apply them to the art of visual storytelling for film and television. Preparing to perform on stage and preparing to perform on set are very different jobs. This course prepares actors to work on the set of professional films and television shows. Based on availability, teachers in other disciplines (voice, movement, etc.) will be invited to join us to weigh in as to how their area of expertise applies to on-camera work.
  
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    DRAMA 3047 — Speech III - Dialects

    1 credit
    Fall and Spring
    Dwight Bacquie

    The course includes continued work on clarity of diction and on dialects with an emphasis on their relationship to character, imagination, and embodiment.
  
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    DRAMA 4011 — Actor Presentations

    1 credit
    Fall
    Claire Karpen and Crystal Dickinson

    In preparation for an evening of scenes to be presented to industry members in both Los Angeles and New York in the spring, students meet regularly in the fall with a faculty member to select pieces which will best serve to introduce the actors to the profession. In the second semester, the scenes are rehearsed and prepared for presentation.
  
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    DRAMA 4014 — Scene Study IV

    3 credits
    Fall
    Evan Yionoulis

    A first semester course in which students continue to integrate aspects of their craft and move towards ease of expression. Focus is on challenging texts which require a facility with language and a depth of characterization.
  
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    DRAMA 4031-41 — Alexander Technique IV

    2 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Carolyn Serota

    Alexander Technique in the fourth year focuses on the continuing development of each student personally and artistically as they deepen their self-awareness, self-knowledge, and poise using the Alexander principles and process. Students are encouraged to develop a continuing spirit of investigation and master techniques for achieving readiness in the moment, for clearing out, for dealing with stress and anxiety, for taking a centered presence into the world. Character transformation work continues for the fourth-year performance season.
  
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    DRAMA 4035 — Acting on Camera II

    2 credits
    Fall
    Bob Krakower

    This course continues the actor’s training in working on camera.
  
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    DRAMA 4036 — Individual Singing Instruction

    2 credits
    Fall
    Deborah Lapidus, David Gaines

    Individual lessons as required for specific productions and solo coaching leading toward audition material.

Drama Undergraduate Studies

  
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    DRAMA H111-2 — Dramaturgy and Context

    6 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Anne Cattaneo, Shana Komittee, Roger Oliver

    A series of lectures/seminars about major dramatists and dramatic forms in their historical contexts, ranging from the ancient Greeks through the 20th century, centered around the works in the Drama Division season.
  
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    DRAMA S337 — Elements of Producing

    2 credits
    Fall
    Elizabeth Whitaker, Stephanie Ybarra

    This course serves to acquaint the actor with the work and responsibilities of the many people involved in theater-making beyond the rehearsal hall and to prepare them for what it might take to produce their own work. Students will examine the function, vision, and day-to-day operations of the various artistic, administrative, and production personnel within a variety of theater models - from larger commercial ventures and non-profit institutions to smaller off and off-off-Broadway models. Students will develop mission statements and seasons for their own prospective theatres, and present their visions to the class. Wherever possible, guest artists in the field will be brought in to talk about their process and work.
  
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    DRAMA T122 — Poetry

    1 credit
    Spring
    Elana Bell

    The focus of this course is to experience the craft of poetry as a reader, writer, and presenter. Students will be reading the work of others, writing works of their own, receiving feedback, revising, and sharing these works with their peers and community.
  
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    DRAMA 447-8 — Bridge to the Profession

    6 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Visiting Faculty

    The fourth year of study provides a variety of professional studio experiences where students study with working professionals who provide them with the knowledge and skills necessary to transition into the industry. These workshops explore a variety of practical aspects of the business – casting, auditioning, on-camera work, producing reels, etc.

     

  
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    DRAMA 1017 — Point of View

    1 credit
    Fall
    René Houtrides

    This semester-long course aims to help students see their training and their art in a larger context — historical, political, and artistic. On a regular basis, they examine the work of artists from theater and other art forms (dance, music, architecture) and engage with scientists, politicians, and activists in person and through screening documentary films. In these encounters with multiple points of view, students develop their own perspectives as actors, artists, and citizens.

Drama Graduate Studies: Acting

  
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    DRAMA 6113 — Ballroom Dancing

    .5 Credits
    Fall
    Steven Dougherty

    Ballroom dancing engages the actor to explore the ways in which people move through their lives physically and psychologically.  Each dance has a different point of view and tells a different story. This first semester class focuses on increasing muscle memory, as well as on physical and mental presence. The work practices ceremony, grace, body-mind connection, sportsmanship and the equal importance of leading and following. The work culminates in a formal ballroom competition including well-known and highly respected judges and master-of-ceremonies from the professional ballroom world.
  
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    DRAMA 6114 — Improvisation

    2 credits
    Fall
    Richard Feldman

    In the first semester, improvisation aims to enhance students’ powers of concentration and relaxation and free them from self-consciousness, fear, and pretense. Through a broad spectrum of exercises and études including object, sensory, and environment work, observation and transformation exercises, neutral scenes, etc., the students expand their imaginations and their powers of expression. They practice giving up a need to control or plan and instead begin to respond spontaneously and personally. Improvisational exercises become increasingly structured with an emphasis on given circumstance work—who, what, when, where, why—in order to start the process of scene work.
  
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    DRAMA 6124 — Scene Study I

    2 credits
    Spring
    Richard Feldman

    This second semester course builds upon the work of the Improvisation classes and aims to further free students from self-consciousness as they explore the initial stages of work on scenes.
  
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    DRAMA 6125 — Mask I

    1 credit
    Spring
    Kathleen McKenney

    In the second semester, the work on neutral mask is designed to free the student from self-consciousness and to release imaginative impulses leading to uninhibited physical expression, together with economy of gesture. The neutral mask removes reliance on voice or facial expression to communicate and shifts the actor’s focus onto and into the body.  This change of physical identity breaks down inhibitions and serves not only to release the student’s imaginative capacity for transformation, but to prepare the way for equally courageous characterization without a mask. 
  
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    DRAMA 6131-41 — Alexander Technique I

    2 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Charlotte Okie

    In first-year Alexander, focus is on the development of awareness of oneself in movement: to recognize and learn how to release excess tension and to change physical habits which interfere with the free, easeful, centered use of the body. Through a series of experiential exercises, hands-on guidance by the teacher, and selected readings, students are introduced to the basic Alexander concepts: that we all have habitual patterns that restrict freedom and choice; that the primary control (the head/neck relationship) governs physical organization; that the power of thought affects physicality. The three tools of the Alexander Technique — awareness, conscious inhibition, and direction — are presented and studied in class through observation and hands-on teaching in chair work, table work, floor work, and movement activities. Basic anatomy of the musculoskeletal system is studied and is immediately applied experientially in activities such as sitting, standing, walking and bending. Students learn an Alexander self-lesson to help them maintain good use on their own.
 

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