Dec 06, 2021  
College Catalog 2019-2020 
    
College Catalog 2019-2020 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

All Courses


 

Graduate Studies: Core Seminars in Music History

  
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    GRMUS H686 — First Nights

    2 credits
    Spring
    Thomas Forrest Kelly

    A study of the first performances of five iconic pieces: Monteverdis Orfeo, Handel’s Messiah, Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique, and Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring. For each piece we will consider the cultural context, the musical background (what were people used to listening to?), and give very close attention to the score, the performers, the audience, and the details that can turn monumental pieces of the past into what they were then: cutting-edge pieces of contemporary music.
  
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    GRMUS H694 — Music & 20th C. Movements

    2 credits
    Spring
    Fredara Hadley

    This course explores the connection between music and 20th-century sociopolitical movements and considers the complex ways in which music affects historical inflection points and is affected by them. Topics include: a survey of the diverse music genres associated with women’s suffrage and women’s equality causes; music and the Civil Rights era; and immigration movements. The course takes a wide-angle view of the music associated with these movements so as to emphasize the diverse musical responses to profound social change. Students will complete projects that highlight the relationship between musical innovation and social shifts as a way to underscore the ways in which music soundtracks the upheaval of change.

  
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    GRMUS 688 — Church as Conservatory

    2 credits
    Spring
    Fredara Hadley

    Based on W.E.B. Du Bois’s notion of the church as the “social center” of African American life, this course positions the church as the conservatory of African American music. Students will examine the ways in which the church, for centuries, has been the main locale of acculturation, pedagogy, performance, and tradition in Black American music, from which diverse genres emerge and circulate into the global musical sphere.

    We will survey hymns, spirituals, art songs, freedom songs, classical choral music, jazz, contemporary Christian music, and praise and worship music (i.e. music for liturgy) with special emphasis placed on the development and stylistic changes within the gospel music tradition. Course readings will provide in-depth historical and cultural context for musical analysis. Students will complete an ethnomusicological project applying knowledge gleaned alongside the rich tapestry of African American church music in New York City. 


Graduate Studies: Core Seminars in Music Theory

  
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    GRMUS T603 — Graduate Theory Review

    3 credits
    Fall
    Faculty

    This review course is designed for entering graduate music students. The integrated format combines aural, visual, tactile, and written activities with analysis; keyboard; exercises in figured bass and melody harmonization; and short compositions that incorporate various harmonic idioms; singing; and transcription. The course comprises a reorientation that reveals how theory, composition, listening, and analysis can inform performance and provides a foundation for more-advanced theory courses. The first half of the course focuses on diatonicism and the second addresses chromaticism. 
  
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    GRMUS T606 — Bach’s Matthew and John Passions

    2 credits
    Fall
    Kendall Briggs

    Bach’s St. Matthew and St. John Passions represent the greatest exemplification of passion composition in the Baroque. St. John’s Passion represents his first foray into the genre as he begins his tenure at the St. Thomas Church in 1723. His Matthew Passion is his last and is perhaps the greatest of all passions ever composed. Its sheer size and scale mark it as the most impressive dramatic work by Bach. This course will analyze and explore these two great works from both compositional and performance viewpoints. Elements of compositional design, allegory, and symbolism will be examined to help elucidate these magnificent works. Performance and practice issues will be discussed in relation to the score and interpretation.

     

  
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    GRMUS T615 — Beethoven’s Late Piano Sonatas

    2 credits
    Spring
    Kendall Briggs

    The late piano sonatas represent Beethoven’s final statements on the genre as well as his unique mark on the use of sonata and other architectonic principles. These unique works stand as monuments in the compositional history of the piano sonata. All composers since have had to reconcile their own piano sonatas to those of Beethoven. This course will focus on his late sonatas, beginning with op. 101 and finishing with his remarkable op. 111. Because of their unique nature and proximity, the late sonatas will be compared with his late string quartets in order to understand more fully Beethoven’s compositional process at the end of his life. Sonatas written at the time by other composers will also be included, to help situate Beethoven’s own in the appropriate context. 

  
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    GRMUS T616 — The Late Beethoven Quartets

    2 credits
    Fall
    Kendall Briggs

    Beethoven’s late string quartets are often considered the greatest body of literature ever written for that genre. These quartets (Op. 127 through Op. 135) were written in the last three years of the master’s life; their influence is unprecedented in music literature. Since their composition they have been the standard by which all composers must measure their creative efforts in this genre. This course will explore the late quartets in detail, marking their compositional significance in relation to Beethoven’s other works and examining their effect on the development of the quartet as a genre. The relationship of these works to extramusical events in Beethoven’s life, to his contemporaries, and to the future of quartet writing will be stressed. The history of the string quartet as well as performance practices will also be discussed.
  
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    GRMUS T623 — Advanced Counterpoint: Compositional Counterpoint and the Organic Line

    2 credits
    Fall
    Philip Lasser

    An intensive course devoted to studying the contrapuntal nature of music. Counterpoint is treated here not as a historical, style-based study, but rather as a fundamental controlling force in the syntax of Western music. The class will cover all the species in two, three, and four voices as well as explore works from Bach to today using unique contrapuntal tools for analysis. The class is designed as a rigorous seminar with weekly written assignments. Required of all undergraduate Composition majors and master’s Conducting majors. Open to advanced students in other majors.​
  
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    GRMUS T624 — Advanced Counterpoint: Invertible Counterpoint, Canon and Fugue

    2 credits
    Spring
    Philip Lasser

    Prerequisite: GRMUS T623. Building upon the skills and techniques acquired in the fall semester, this course will explore two, three, and four voice fully invertible counterpoint as well as the secrets to writing all types of canons from regular to augmentation and cancrizan canons and will culminate in the study and the writing of Bach-style fugues. Concurrently the class will analyze relevant works from the repertoire including an in-depth study of fugues from The Well-Tempered Klavier. Required of all undergraduate Composition majors and master’s Conducting majors. Open to advanced students in other majors who have taken the fall semester of Advanced Counterpoint.
  
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    GRMUS T625-6 — Advanced Studies in Harmony

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Philip Lasser

    Open to Composition majors and advanced students in other majors. An advanced course examining the harmonic principals of the tonal language and their evolution through history. Based on Nadia Boulanger’s method, the class involves extensive written and aural work on chorale harmonizations from triads to ninth chords, with special emphasis on doublings and chord spacings. Work evolves gradually from diatonic to chromatic. Analysis of music from all periods will also be covered stressing harmonic issues as key elements of style and compositional organization.
  
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    GRMUS T633 — Music in Context

    2 credits
    Fall, Spring
    Philip Lasser

    An intensive special-topics course devoted to analyzing and discussing works that students are currently preparing for performance. Basic tools for contrapuntal, harmonic, and formal analysis will be established through examination of diverse works from the repertoire. Students will then apply these analytical techniques toward a work of their choosing as their final project and present in groups, an in-class lecture-performance discussing collaboratively the analysis and its relevance to interpretation. Open to individuals and chamber groups.
  
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    GRMUS T637 — Contrapuntal Analysis: The Fabric of Music

    2 credits
    Spring
    Philip Lasser

    A seminar to analyze the contrapuntal fabric of music. Western music, both modal and tonal, has developed intricate ways to transmit meaning and beauty through sound. What are these processes and how do they affect how we understand music? Emphasis will be made on the relevance of this analysis to informed interpretation, performance, and composition. Following a presentation of the tools and concepts necessary for this analytical method, the course will examine major works from the High Baroque to Debussy. Students will also select works for individual analysis and discussion. Open to D.M.A. and advanced M.M. students.
  
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    GRMUS T638 — String Music: Brahms to Bartok

    2 credits
    Spring
    Behzad Ranjbaran

    This course is devoted to an in-depth and comprehensive analysis of select string works from the late-19th to the mid-20th century. Our thorough analytical study will cover many innovations in harmony, melody, form, texture, rhythm, and string techniques. We will study works by composers that contributed to the development and stylistic diversity of the string repertoire in this period including Brahms, Debussy, Ravel, Schoenberg, Berg, and Bartók. Students are encouraged to perform select passages from works studied in class in order to enable a greater understanding of various elements of these complex works.
  
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    GRMUS T640 — The New and the Old

    2 credits
    Spring
    Jonathan Dawe

    A study of pairs of works from different eras in which significant links and lineages are established and explored. Principal to this analytic survey is the investigation of musical expressions that make connections beyond historic periods. How do works reinvent the past and what constitutes genuine compositional innovations? Included in this collection are: Babbitt and Brahms; Monteverdi and Glass; Hindemith and Bach; and Stravinsky and Machaut.
  
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    GRMUS T641 — The American Symphony: Ives to Corigliano

    2 credits
    Fall
    Wayne Oquin

    This course focuses on the symphonies and major orchestral works written in the United States during the 20th century. We will examine staples of the American symphonic repertory such as Charles Ives’s Symphony No. 4, Aaron Copland’s Appalachian Spring, and William Schuman’s Symphony No. 3. We will also cover the symphonic works of Walter Piston, Roy Harris, Samuel Barber, Elliott Carter, Gunther Schuller, Christopher Rouse, and John Corigliano. Throughout the semester we will proceed chronologically, retracing the steps of these and other composers in their search for a distinctive American voice.
  
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    GRMUS T644 — Beethoven: The Heroic Decade, 1800-1810

    2 credits
    Spring
    Wayne Oquin

    During the years of 1800-1810 Beethoven singlehandedly altered the history of Western music. In his so-called middle period, Beethoven’s vast creative output contained many of his most revered works: Symphonies Nos. 3 through 6; the Op. 59 (“Razumovsky”) String Quartets; Piano Sonatas Op. 27 (Quasi una fantasia) through Op. 81a (Les Adieux); and his opera Fidelio. This course will cover each of these works and others, analyzing the music, retracing Beethoven’s artistic development, and putting the works into their historical context. Frequently we will refer to facsimiles of the autograph manuscripts, critical editions, and analytical writings.
  
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    GRMUS T645 — Methods of Analysis

    2 credits
    Fall
    Jonathan Dawe

    A course that explores analytic approaches to tonal and post-tonal theories. Included in the study is a survey of important speculative and practical theories of the 18th and 19th centuries as well as an investigation of significant theoretic traditions of the 20th century. This course also offers an introduction to the recent diverse approaches in music analysis currently developing in the 21st century.
  
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    GRMUS T657 — Schubert and Schumann: The Song Cycles

    2 credits
    Spring
    Kendall Briggs

     

    This course will explore selected song cycles of Franz Schubert and Robert Schumann including: Schubert’s Die Schöne Müllerin and Winterreise and Schumann’s Dichterliebe, Frauenliebe und -Leben, and Liederkreis (opus 39). Following an introduction to German Romanticism and analytical techniques, the course will focus on the nature of the song cycle, including large-scale narrative and detailed exploration of specific songs. Weekly discussions of readings and analyses will be reinforced with live performance. A central question will concern the role of analysis in informing a musical interpretation.

  
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    GRMUS T662 — Schoenberg and the Serial Legacy

    2 credits
    Fall
    Jonathan Dawe

    Shortly after fully forming his 12-tone method, Schoenberg proudly proclaimed that it would play a central role for the next 100 years. Just what was so significant about this compositional procedure that led him to anticipate its profound effect on the development of modern music for 100 years to come? This course examines the many dimensions of Schoenberg’s 12-tone techniques, not only through the study of specific works but also through its influence on compositional thinking of later important composers. Central to the study is an investigation of the deeper conceptual ideas behind the method that affect musical structure, motion, logic, and embrace Karlheinz Stockhausen’s proclamation: “Serial music demands serial thinking.”
  
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    GRMUS T663 — European Avant-garde Composers: 1945-1980

    2 credits
    Spring
    Jonathan Dawe

    Instilled with a newfound sense of purpose and discovery in the second half of the 20th century, young European composers radically advanced compositional thought and in doing so reconsidered the very foundations of musical language. This course offers an analytic path through important musical compositions that represent this period of avant-garde achievements. Included in the survey are works by Boulez, Stockhausen, Nono, Ligeti, and Dallapiccola.
  
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    GRMUS T664 — The Music of Stravinsky

    2 credits
    Fall
    Michelle DiBucci

    Stravinsky ranks as one of the most influential composers in the history of music. Beginning with his early ballets Stravinsky changed the course of classical music and inspired artists across diverse genres and disciplines. This course provides a chronological examination of the evolution of Stravinsky’s style by examining his use of harmony, counterpoint, rhythm, timbre and form. Concurrently, the course will consider Stravinsky’s musical influences and how his work ushered in new musical trends which continue to inspire composers today. In-depth analysis of seminal works from his Russian, Neo-Classic and Serial periods including The Firebird, Symphony of Psalms and In Memoriam Dylan Thomas will be a featured part of weekly class discussions and individual projects and assignments.
  
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    GRMUS T671 — Introduction to Post-Tonal Theory

    2 credits
    Fall
    Jonathan Dawe

    An engaging study of important analytic approaches to modern music that have developed during the second half of the 20th century. Included in the survey is a study of important post-tonal theories, including Set-Theories, Klumpenhouwer Networks, Array Design, and Transformation Graphs applied to analyses of works by composers as diverse as Webern, Stravinsky, Boulez, Part, Ligeti, Glass, and Wuorinen.
  
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    GRMUS T682 — Music Theory Pedagogy

    2 credits
    Fall
    Steven Laitz

    This course offers a practical introduction to teaching methods in music theory. Students will gain experience designing lessons plans, homework assignments, and assessments. The course also includes a survey of teaching materials for music theory, as well as advanced analysis projects. Each student will have the opportunity to teach sample lessons in undergraduate Music Theory and Analysis classes. Required for music students interested in fellowship and assistantship positions in the Music Theory and Analysis department; these assignments are contingent upon overall class standing and evaluation by the instructor. Undergraduates may enroll with permission of the instructor.
  
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    GRMUS T693 — Schenkerian Analysis I

    2 credits
    Fall
    Eric Wen

    Analysis of excerpts and of complete movements and pieces from the tonal repertory (1700 to 1900) using the Schenkerian approach. The purpose of the course is to enable both performers and composers to hear and understand music more deeply in ways that will benefit their own music making.
  
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    GRMUS T694 — Schenkerian Analysis II

    2 credits
    Spring
    Eric Wen

    Prerequisite: GRMUS T693 . The analysis of complete pieces and movements using the Schenkerian approach. Two areas of special concentration will be sonata form and the relationship between words and music from a Schenkerian perspective.

     


Graduate Studies: Elective Seminars in Music

  
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    GRMUS S687 — The Great Pianists

    2 credits
    Fall
    José García-León

    This course provides a survey of the main pianists since the invention of the instrument, from Mozart to present day. By studying their recordings and surviving documents, we will analyze and discuss their pianistic styles, their legacy, and their approaches to public performances and recording sessions. Pianists included are Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin, Liszt, Clara Schumann, Paderewski, Rachmaninov, Horowitz, Rubinstein, Lipatti, Gould, Hess, Van Cliburn, Argerich, Barenboim, Brendel, Perahia, Pires, Uchida, and many others.

Graduate Studies: Departmental Practicums in Music

  
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    GRMUS P658 — Jazz Practicum for Pianists

    2 credits
    Spring
    Ted Rosenthal

    A chronological overview of jazz’s most important piano stylists, defining their lasting contributions to the art form. Fundamentals of the jazz language, such as harmony, rhythm, melody, song forms, and improvisational techniques will be addressed. Ear training, transposition, and harmonic analysis will also be utilized to enhance the student’s total musical awareness. Non-Jazz majors only.
  
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    GRMUS P670 — Composers and Choreographers

    2 credits
    Fall
    Jerome Begin, Janis Brenner, and Daniel Ott

    For selected Composition and Dance majors only. Exploring techniques of collaboration through exercises in problem solving and the development of a work. The course will introduce to each discipline the needs, vocabulary, and work methods of the other and search for the common ground on which each can flourish while nourishing the other. Advisement will be provided for ongoing showings of works in progress. Finished pieces will be presented in concert format.
  
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    GRMUS P671 — Early Music Vocal Literature

    2 credits
    Fall
    Avi Stein

    A performance-based seminar surveying vocal literature from the early 17th century through the mid-18th century. Genres to be covered include solo songs with continuo accompaniment, opera, oratorio, and the 18th-century cantata. Assigned works will be studied through in-class performance and detailed discussion of historical context, parallel instrumental trends, and performance practice including discussion of recitative and ornamentation. This course is open to third- and fourth-year undergraduate voice students, graduate voice students, as well as players of continuo instruments. Other students may be enrolled with the permission of the instructor. 
  
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    GRMUS P673 — Opera Lab Seminar

    2 credits
    Fall
    Cori Ellison

  
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    GRMUS P674 — Opera Lab Practicum

    2 credits
    Spring
    Cori Ellison

  
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    GRMUS P677-8 — Opera Performance Technique for Pianists

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Diane Richardson

    A course designed for pianists with focus on all styles of operatic literature. Emphasis is placed on techniques of preparation and rehearsal of ensemble as well as solo repertoire. Effective means of producing orchestral textures at the piano are studied. Required of all second-year Collaborative Piano majors; Conducting and Piano majors with permission of the instructor.
  
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    GRMUS P679-80 — Russian Diction/Vocal Literature

    2 credits per semester
    Fall and Spring
    Gina Levinson

    Offered in alternate years. Meticulous study of Russian phonetics with emphasis on vocalism. Detailed interpretation of texts, and expressive singing in Russian. Concentrated study of rules and sounds of the International Phonetic Alphabet (I.P.A.) and its direct application to Russian vocal repertoire. Chronological examination of the most important works by famous Russian composers, such as Glinka, Rimsky-Korsakov, Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff, Shostakovich, Prokofiev, Schnittke, and others. Public recital at the conclusion of the spring term. Open to Voice, Collaborative Piano, and Conducting majors.
  
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    GRMUS P682 — British and American Song Literature

    2 credits
    Spring
    J.J. Penna

    Prerequisite: English Diction  . A performance seminar addressing stylistic trends, poetic treatment, and musical development as they relate to the writing of song in English. In-class performance and discussion will provide detailed study of individual songs as well as an introduction to the broad-based historical and literary concepts that shaped the literature. As the tradition of song craft is closely wedded to the established literary canon, time will be devoted to the study of poems from a technical point of view as they influence musical setting. Repertoire will be chosen in conjunction with each student’s studio instructor and jury requirements.
  
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    GRMUS P683-4 — French Vocal Literature

    2 credits per semester
    Fall and Spring
    Glenn Morton

    Prerequisite: French Diction . An overall view of the performance and interpretation of the French vocal repertoire, including both song and opera, from its origins to the present. Singers and pianists perform in class periodically with background information, phonetic transcription, and translation for each piece required. Coaching in class by the instructor. Open class recital at conclusion of spring term.
  
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    GRMUS P685-6 — German Vocal Literature

    2 credits per semester
    Fall and Spring
    J.J. Penna

    Prerequisite: German Diction . Open to Piano majors by permission of the instructor. A survey of the songs of Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Brahms, Liszt, Strauss, Mahler, Marx, and Berg. All songs will be performed and discussed in class.
  
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    GRMUS P687-8 — Italian Vocal Literature

    2 credits per semester
    Fall and Spring
    Corradina Caporello

    Prerequisite: Italian Diction . A chronological survey of the Italian vocal repertoire from the first monodic music by Monteverdi, Peri, and Caccini to Mozart, Rossini, Bellini, Donizetti, Verdi, Puccini, and the Verismo School. Emphasis on all aspects of solo performance and on the understanding of the different stylistic qualities of each composer.
  
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    GRMUS P691-2 — Instrumental Accompanying I

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Jonathan Feldman

    A performance class in which participants prepare repertoire and play without rehearsal with a core group of instrumentalists. Extensive study of orchestral reductions, comparison of different editions, examination of full orchestral scores, and discussion of other options for realizations for the piano. Additional focus on ways to imitate and produce orchestral sounds on the piano. Repertoire will also include shorter duo works, non-orchestral. Some sight-reading included. Required of all first-year Collaborative Piano majors; Conducting and Piano majors with permission of the instructor.

  
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    GRMUS P693-4 — Skills of Vocal Accompanying

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Lydia Brown

    Through the study of English, French, and German song, this course endeavors to identify and explore the specific skills required of both pianists and singers in the successful rehearsal and performance of this repertoire. Focus on performance practice issues and how they differ from composer to composer. Required of all first-year Collaborative Piano majors; Voice, Conducting, and Piano majors with permission of the instructor.
  
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    GRMUS P695-6 — The Art of Vocal Coaching

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Lydia Brown

    Prerequisite: GRMUS P693-4  This course seeks to develop the vocal coaching skills of student pianists/coaches to their highest possible level. Beginning with teacher-singer demonstrations and discussions, the class gradually progresses to the student pianists/coaches. Interactive discussion and evaluation. Collaborative Piano majors only.
  
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    GRMUS P697-8 — Orchestral Keyboard Repertoire

    2 credits per semester
    Fall, Spring
    Eric Huebner

    A course open to Collaborative Piano and Piano majors interested in learning orchestral keyboard repertoire for piano, celeste, electric keyboard, and harpsichord. Selected repertoire will encompass programs that the Juilliard orchestras (including Lab Orchestra for student conductors) will be performing during the school year. Works written by Juilliard student composers and requiring keyboard will also be included. Standard repertoire not scheduled for performance but important for the keyboard player to know will be an important element of the course, as will the review of other responsibilities which fall to the orchestral keyboard player, such as solo rehearsals, instrumental auditions, and choral rehearsals. By permission only.
  
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    GRMUS P791-2 — Instrumental Accompanying II

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Jonathan Feldman

    Prerequisite: GRMUS P691-2  A performance class in which participants prepare repertoire and play with a core group of instrumentalists. The repertoire assignments will be decided based on the student’s own repertory needs. Works of study will include orchestral reductions, large works (not sonatas) and smaller works. The focus will be on 19th and 20th century repertoire. Required of all second-year Collaborative Piano majors; Conducting and Piano majors with permission of the instructor. 


Graduate Studies: General Practicums in Music

  
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    GRMUS P610 — Baroque as a Second Language: Historical Performance for Modern Players

    2 credits
    Fall
    Robert Mealy

    This class offers an intensive exploration of the specific techniques and styles of historical performance, concentrating on the rich and virtuosic chamber and orchestral music of the 17th and 18th centuries. It will focus on French and Italian Baroque style, through study of original musical sources and contemporary writing about performance, as well as through hands-on experience for string players using Baroque bows. Although designed primarily for modern string players, the class welcomes oboes and bassoons as well, to explore historical performance practice on modern instruments. Admission is by instructor approval. Baroque bows will be provided. There will be at least one class performance per semester.
  
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    GRMUS P611 — Baroque as a Second Language: Historical Performance for Modern Players

    2 credits
    Spring
    Robert Mealy

    This class offers an intensive exploration of the specific techniques and styles of historical performance, concentrating on the rich and virtuosic chamber and orchestral music of the 17th and 18th centuries. It will focus on French and Italian Baroque style, through study of original musical sources and contemporary writing about performance, as well as through hands-on experience for string players using Baroque bows. Although designed primarily for modern string players, the class welcomes oboes and bassoons as well, to explore historical performance practice on modern instruments. Admission is by instructor approval. Baroque bows will be provided. There will be at least one class performance per semester.
  
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    GRMUS P633 — Improvisation

    2 credits
    Fall, Spring
    Peter Sykes

    Focusing on one of the most essential skills for any musician, in this introductory course we learn to improvise on our instruments: creating a melody on the spot; developing variations on a given bass or chord progression; learning to modulate; improvising within an ABA or a larger form; playing by ear; experimenting with sound-based free improvisation; combining music with poetry; and more. We improvise mostly in small groups of duos or trios, balancing playing and listening. Open to all instruments and singers. No prior experience in improvisation is needed.​
  
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    GRMUS P651-2 — Performance Workshop on 20th- and 21st-Century Music

    2 credits per semester
    Fall and Spring
    Joel Sachs

    Performance and discussion of a broad variety of instrumental and vocal works spanning the 20th and 21st centuries. Emphasis is placed on issues of learning, notation, and interpretation. Students will perform one or several times during each semester, and will lead the discussions. Brief papers summarizing the projects are required.
  
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    GRMUS P656 — Jazz Practicum

    2 credits
    Spring
    Ron Blake

    A hands-on approach to the study of jazz improvisation through an examination of the work of masters such as Louis Armstrong, Lester Young, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, and others, as well as in-class performances. Emphasis will be placed on the practice of the rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic aspects of jazz vocabulary, blues, and standard song forms, transcribed solos, and strategies for developing one’s creative potential. Non-Jazz majors only.
  
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    GRMUS P660 — Introduction to Music Production

    2 credits
    Fall, Spring
    Greg Kalember; Milica Paranosic

    An introduction to the basic skills needed for composing and arranging electronic music. Topics of study include sequencing, sampling, and editing and processing digital audio. Basic Macintosh skills are required.
  
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    GRMUS P662 — Scoring to Picture

    2 credits
    Fall
    Edward Bilous

    Prerequisite: GRMUS P660 . For students interested in learning the fundamental skills needed to compose and produce film music. Topics include spotting a picture, creating a musical structure based on visual images, styles of music composition and production, and analysis of traditional film scores. Students will be required to compose and produce original scores to excerpts from feature films, documentaries, and other filmed media.
  
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    GRMUS P663 — Creation, Improvisation & Technology

    2 credits
    Fall, Spring
    Mari Kimura

    This special course is for students embracing diverse forms of music making, challenging conventional distinctions between classical performance, composition, improvisation, extended technique, world music, jazz, electronic media, computer music and chamber music.  Students can choose their own interest and concentration without the traditional boundaries or ‘genre’ in music. For example, performance students can study extended technique for their instruments.  String students in particular, could study with the instructor on contemporary string technique and extended technique she developed, “Subharmonics”, and how to incorporate such element in composition and improvisation. For students who are interested in interactive computer technology will have access to “MUGIC™”, a prototype motion sensor currently being developed by the instructor at UC Irvine. 

  
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    GRMUS P664 — Scoring to Picture Workshop

    2 credits
    Spring
    Ed Bilous

    GRMUS P662   is a prerequisite for this course.  This intensive workshop is designed for Juilliard composers interested in music for narrative media. Students will score an excerpt of a film or TV/web series episode with the expert guidance of an established master composer of film and TV music. The workshop experience will expose students to all aspects of the process from creation to production, including a spotting session, recording the score with Juilliard musicians, and a final film mix.
  
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    GRMUS P665 — Independent Study in Music Production

    2 credits
    Fall, Spring
    Edward Bilous

    With permission of the instructor. A class for advanced students interested in working with new technology in the creation of original compositions. Projects may include the use of computers and electronic or acoustic instruments in live performance or the creation of a recorded work.
  
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    GRMUS P666 — Music Production Workshop

    2 credits
    Fall. Spring
    Edward Bilous

    Prerequisite: GRMUS P660 . A survey of electronic music production techniques most frequently used by composers, arrangers, and producers in the recording industry. Topics of study include creating rhythm tracks, arranging for electronic instruments, basic mixing skills, and the use of signal processing devices. Homework will include creative projects as well as listening assignments.
  
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    GRMUS P667 — Introduction to Interactive Music Technology

    2 credits
    Fall, Spring
    Mari Kimura

    An introductory class in which students will learn about the revolutionary program called MaxMSP (digital signal processing in Max), which allows musicians to perform interactive and electroacoustic computer music without any external devices such as synthesizers.
  
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    GRMUS P668 — Advanced Interactive Music Technology

    2 credits
    Fall, Spring
    Mari Kimura

    Prerequisite: GRMUS P667 . An advanced class in which students will be introduced to the revolutionary program called MaxMSP (digital signal processing in Max), which allows musicians to perform interactive and electroacoustic computer music without any external devices such as synthesizers. Students will create and perform their own works using “Max,” and will discuss aspects of performance practice and musicianship related to interactive computer music. Cutting-edge technology and musical activities on the Internet will also be explored.
  
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    GRMUS P675 — Performance Enhancement

    2 credits
    Fall, Spring
    Noa Kageyama

    Performance-oriented, this course presents Sport Psychology methods that have been shown to assist students in achieving optimal performance levels under the pressure of juries, recitals, competitions, and auditions. Students will learn how to deal with fear and doubts, channel nervousness, focus better, and perform at a high level in stressful situations. A Performance Skills Profile, which identifies mental strengths and areas for improvement, will be administered and interpreted for each student. Through a series of practical exercises and mock auditions, students will apply established strategies and techniques, such as mental rehearsal, “deep” practice, and the “Centering” process, for achieving their best when it matters most.

Graduate Studies: Entrepreneurship and Career Development in Music

  
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    GRMUS E605 — Career Development Seminar

    2 credits
    Fall, Spring
    Bärli Nugent

    This highly collaborative seminar comprises three primary areas of focus: the finding and refinement of one’s own artistic voice; the polished production of a wide array of career materials; and the hands-on acquisition of tools and experiences that open pathways to new possibilities. Also woven throughout is increasing the awareness of how to: recognize opportunity; build your team; understand behind-the-scenes thinking; find and commission a composer; walk through a job search; develop an authentic public speaking persona; harness music’s power to effect change; enhance the ability to enter any situation professionally; and take continuous and organic action towards your career right now. Revision and completion of the significant number of weekly assignments is supported by five individual meetings with the teacher during the course of the semester.
  
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    GRMUS E613 — The Musician as Entrepreneur

    2 credits
    Fall
    Benjamin Sosland

     

    What is your definition of success? What are your artistic goals and how will you achieve them? How can you balance your musical dreams with the reality of making a living? What is the mindset and attitude of successful entrepreneurs? Through case studies, exercises, readings, and presentations, this course is designed to encourage you to identify and cultivate your entrepreneurial potential.

  
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    GRMUS E615 — Breaking Barriers: Classical Music in an Age of Pop

    2 credits
    Spring
    Greg Sandow

    There’s been talk for years about a crisis in classical music. We’ve all heard that the audience is getting older, that ticket sales are down, and that funding is harder to find. In this course, we ask where classical music fits in our changing culture. How real is the crisis? What can we do to make things better? We also look at how classical music is changing. As an exercise in making change ourselves, we talk about entrepreneurship – how musicians can find their own audience, and make careers in new and creative ways.
  
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    GRMUS E620 — Speaking of Music: How to Talk and Write About Music

    2 credits
    Fall
    Greg Sandow

    In today’s climate, musicians need to reach out to their audience and to the community. To do that, they need to talk about the music they make, which is something we all can learn to do better. In this course, we play recordings in class, and find ways to describe what we hear. We also read music critics, as examples (both good and bad) of how music gets talked about, which gives you one extra benefit: you’ll learn how critics work, how they think, and what your relationship with them can be, as your career advances.
  
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    GRMUS E633-4 — Suzuki Pedagogy

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty

    Open to Piano, Violin, and Cello majors. With permission of the Executive Director, School for Strings.This course extends one year of credit to approved students who wish to complete the first year of the two-year Suzuki-based Teacher-Training program. This year includes weekly seminars and discussions as well as intensive observation of the lessons and classes in the School for Strings. Further information is available from the registrar.
  
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    GRMUS E640 — Insights Into Learning: An Introduction to Music Pedagogy

    2 credits
    Fall
    Edward Bilous

    An introduction to new approaches to teaching music. Material covered may be applied to both classroom and private lessons. Students will have the opportunity to participate in lessons designed and led by various master teachers, and, in turn, will be required to create a lesson plan on a subject of their choosing. Weekly reading assignments and special projects. Insights Into Learning: An Introduction to Music Pedagogy  is recommended for students interested in becoming teaching fellows in the Music Theory and Analysis department, and is suggested for students interested in general music pedagogy. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the registrar.
  
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    GRMUS E644 — Arts in Education

    2 credits
    Spring
    Thomas Cabaniss

    A class for students interested in learning about teaching. Among the topics explored are multiple intelligence theory, arts education, and the development of human intelligence and aesthetic education. The main teaching tools are activities led by artist/ teachers who guide participants through creative challenges directly linked to problems solved by masters in major works of art. The goal of the class is to aid the participants in developing a teaching style that promotes a sense of ownership of artistic ideas and awakens a curiosity for lifelong learning. Classwork includes weekly reading assignments and two projects.
  
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    GRMUS E651 — Piano Pedagogy

    2 credits
    Fall
    Aaron Wunsch

    Learning and teaching are two sides of the same coin. In this course, we shall investigate the process of learning and how we, as teachers, participate in this process. The practical approach to teaching at different levels will focus on such considerations as the psychology of learning and teaching, the study and evaluation of teaching repertoire and materials, the use of technology in teaching, as well as approaches to the learning and teaching of keyboard skills and musical literacy. The course will include lecture, discussion, and demonstration sessions and, in addition, can serve as a practicum for participants with students of their own.
  
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    GRMUS E653 — The Art of Teaching in the Music Studio

    2 credits
    Spring
    Virginia Allen

    This course will help students identify and develop the skills necessary to be effective private studio teachers. Through assigned readings, discussions, and observations of master teachers, students will explore learning styles, teaching strategies, assessment strategies, resources, and methods and approaches to cultivate a creative learning environment. Students will learn by doing as they teach a limited number of private lessons. Open to fourth-year undergraduate students by permission of the Registrar.
  
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    GRMUS E670 — The Arts and Society

    2 credits
    Fall
    Damian Woetzel

    This survey course examines the intersection of arts and society, looking specifically at the role of arts and artists in addressing issues facing the world today. Through extensive reading lists, case studies, individual and group projects, and conversations with distinguished guests, we will explore areas including but not limited to law, health care, education, science, and civic participation to consider our ideal version of a collective future and how we might use arts, creativity, and culture to help get us there. Past guests have included Elizabeth Alexander (poet, memoirist, and president of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation), Vijay Gupta (violinist, social justice advocate, and 2018 John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellow), Mitch Landrieu (lawyer, author, and former New Orleans mayor), Sarah Lewis (author, curator, and Harvard University Assistant Professor in the Department of History of Art and Architecture and the Department of African and African American Studies), Caroline Shaw (Pulitzer Prize-winning composer, vocalist, violinist, and producer), and Jeannie Suk Gersen (Harvard Law School John H. Watson, Jr. Professor of Law). Open to 3rd and 4th-year undergraduates and cross-listed as graduate elective; preference given to graduate students.
  
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    GRMUS E674 — Leadership and Innovation in the Creative Arts

    2 credits
    Spring
    J.Y. Song

    Individuals in creative industries face all kinds of problems that pose significant challenges to their careers. These include highly volatile career environments, competitive conditions, a complex global environment, and difficult politics and conflicts between individuals and organizations. This course looks at how leaders in the creative industries develop strategies to deal with such challenges. Stressing the importance of innovation in entrepreneurial endeavors, we will study the work of artists in different disciplines—Pina Bausch, Daniel Barenboim, and Ferran Adrià. We will also look at leaders whose initiative and foresight have had significant impact on the music industry: Klaus Heymann at Naxos, Peter Gelb at the Metropolitan Opera, and Steve Jobs at Apple. By the end of the semester, students should understand fundamental concepts in leadership, entrepreneurship, and innovation. 

Graduate Studies: Departmental Requirements in Music

  
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    GRMUS R600 — Conductors’ Forum

    0 credit
    Full Year
    David Robertson and Guest Conductors

    Conductors’ Forum is an opportunity for Conducting majors to engage in conversation with David Robertson and guest conductors, following observation of their rehearsals with orchestras on the Lincoln Center campus. Conducting majors only.
  
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    GRMUS R601-2 — Sonatas for Accompanists I

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Collaborative Piano Faculty

    Study and performance of the vast sonata literature for all instruments, building the communication skills necessary for efficient and effective rehearsal with instrumentalists, and leading to polished performances. Repertoire chosen for each individual student’s needs. Collaborative Piano majors only.
  
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    GRMUS R603-4 — Composition Seminar

    2 credits
    Full Year
    Robert Beaser

    A seminar for all graduate Composition majors concentrating on the practicalities of making a career in composition.
  
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    GRMUS R611-2 — Songs for Accompanists

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Lydia Brown, Gina Levinson, J.J. Penna, Cameron Stowe and Brian Zeger

    Applied study of the vast song repertoire in all languages. Study includes aspects of style, technique, ensemble, and, when singers are partners, vocal coaching issues. Repertoire chosen for each individual student’s needs. Collaborative Piano majors only.
  
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    GRMUS R621 — Principles of Conducting

    2 credits
    Fall
    David Robertson & Guest Faculty

    This course covers the wide range of techniques and expertise that a conductor must acquire for a successful career: the physicality of the craft (basic gestures and baton technique); in-depth knowledge of the instrument groups and their requirements (such as bowing for strings); and musical considerations, such as phrasing, and the strategic use of rehearsal time. Conducting exercises include one-line, two-line, and recitative; repertoire selected to illustrate specific challenges. Studies incorporated into the student’s major lesson and Lab Orchestra time. Assigned readings and presentations. Weekly discussions. Visits to orchestra libraries and archives. Conducting majors only.
  
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    GRMUS R622 — Conducting Seminar

    2 credits
    Spring
    David Robertson & Guest Faculty

    This course builds upon the technical studies of the first semester by exploring selected orchestral repertoire in rehearsal and performance. Studies incorporated into the student’s major lesson and Lab Orchestra time. Assigned readings and presentations. Weekly discussions. Conducting majors only.
  
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    GRMUS R623-4 — Studio Accompanying

    0 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty

    Collaborative Piano majors accompany in the studios and classes of instrumental and vocal arts faculty. This requirement, a component of their major study, provides valuable hands-on experience developing collaborative skills under the guidance of a wide variety of professional musicians.
  
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    GRMUS R701-2 — Sonatas for Accompanists II

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Collaborative Piano Faculty

    Study and performance of the vast sonata literature for all instruments, building the communication skills necessary for efficient and effective rehearsal with instrumentalists, and leading to polished performances. Repertoire chosen for each individual student’s needs. Collaborative Piano majors only.
  
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    GRMUS R721-2 — Conducting Seminar

    4 credits
    Full Year
    David Robertson & Guest Faculty

    An advanced seminar building upon the technical studies of the first year and exploring selected orchestral repertoire in rehearsal and performance. Studies incorporated into the student’s major lesson and Lab Orchestra time. Assigned readings and presentations. Weekly discussions. Conducting majors only.
  
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    MSMUS R511-2 — Advanced Score Reading and Musicianship for Conductors

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Kyle Blaha

    An advanced course for conducting students that provides an in-depth study of the repertoire through score-reading and performance. At the core of the class are prepared and sight-read excerpts from the repertoire that provide an intimate and comprehensive understanding of the assigned scores. In addition, exercises in dictation, transposition, singing, keyboard skills, rhythm, and sight-reading allow the students to continuously hone their skills on a personalized basis.
  
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    MSMUS R623-4 — Repertoire Performance

    0 credits
    Full Year
    Collaborative Piano Faculty

    A component of applied studies for Collaborative Piano majors consisting of public performance of required repertoire. Performance venues include Liederabend and Sonatenabend concerts in Paul Hall, master classes in the Peter Jay Sharp Theater, and chamber music concerts in Alice Tully Hall.
  
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    MSMUS 621-2 — Piano Performance Class

    2 credits
    Full Year
    Piano faculty

    Piano majors perform in class repertoire that they are studying with their major teacher.

Doctoral Requirements

  
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    DRMUS E671-2 — Graduate Reading Course in French

    0 credits
    Full Year
    Liberal Arts Faculty

    This course is designed for graduate students preparing for the reading examinations and others who wish to read books and articles in these languages. Principles of grammar and usage are discussed with emphasis on practice of translation.
  
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    DRMUS E681-2 — Graduate Reading Course in German

    0 credits
    Full Year
    Liberal Arts Faculty

    This course is designed for graduate students preparing for the reading examinations and others who wish to read books and articles in these languages. Principles of grammar and usage are discussed with emphasis on practice of translation.
  
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    DRMUS E691-2 — Graduate Reading Course in Italian

    0 credits
    Full Year
    Liberal Arts Faculty

    This course is designed for graduate students preparing for the reading examinations and others who wish to read books and articles in these languages. Principles of grammar and usage are discussed with emphasis on practice of translation.
  
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    DRMUS 810 — Music Reference and Research

    2 credits
    Fall
    Jane Gottlieb

    A systematic study designed to provide the student with a thorough knowledge of sources necessary for research on the doctoral level. Covers library research methods, sources of information on music and music literature of all historic periods, and the process of evaluating editions. Required of all first-year D.M.A. students.
  
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    DRMUS 811-2 — Analytical Methods

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Philip Lasser; Jonathan Dawe

    A seminar devoted to the study of analytical approaches to modal, tonal, and non-tonal music through a careful examination of seminal theoretical treatises and their relevance to music from the early Middle Ages up to the present. Topics will include proportional and tetrachordal thinking of early composers as reflected by Boethius and the Musica Enchiriadis, polyphony and the rise of thoroughbass conceptions of composition as discussed by Tinctoris, Zarlino, and Rameau. Second semester will focus on analysis of major works from Bach to contemporary composers using modern analytical techniques including Schenkerian and contrapuntal analysis as well as 12-tone theory. The course is designed to provide the opportunity for students to gain experience analyzing music and presenting their analyses both in written form and through oral presentations. Required of all first-year D.M.A. students.
  
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    DRMUS 820 — Approaches to Scholarly Editing of Music

    2 credits
    Spring
    Michael Musgrave

    An outline history of music printing and publication up to modern critical and performing editions. With a focus on the changing character and role of editions, this course will begin by examining the stages in the publication process, from autograph to first edition and later editions, noting typical problems in the evaluation of sources and issues in prioritizing. Study continues with the comparison of modern critical and performing editions in several genres (keyboard, strings, wind/brass, vocal, choral) with consideration of the performance consequences. References to historic and modern performances/recordings will elucidate discussion. Assignments will include a class presentation and an extensive term paper. Required of all first-year D.M.A. students.
  
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    DRMUS 901-2 — Doctoral Topics

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Joel Sachs; L. Michael Griffel

    Advanced study of the functions, genres, forms, and procedures of music; historical periods and times of transition; and representative masterworks from various periods. Consideration of the history of music theory, the history of opera, performance practice, and music history pedagogy. Study of and practice in speaking and writing about music. Required of all second-year D.M.A. students.
  
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    DRMUS 911 — Studies in Style Criticism

    2 credits
    Fall
    L. Michael Griffel

    Topic: Perspectives on Mahler and Strauss. An intensive stylistic, historical, and cultural investigation into the music of Gustav Mahler and Richard Strauss, contemporaries who brought the post-Romantic style to its zenith and catapulted the art of music into the 20th century. Magnificent conductors, orchestrators, and creators of symphonic masterpieces, they also demonstrated enormous sensitivity to words in their music for the voice. The course will investigate Mahler’s songs and symphonies, and Strauss’s songs, tone poems, and operas. Problems to be addressed will include Mahler as Jew and Christian, Strauss’s relationship to the Third Reich, autobiography and heroism in music, exoticism, explicit and hidden programmatic content in symphonic music, Mahler’s and Strauss’s responses to earlier composers, songs for voice and orchestra, and the blending of hedonism, perversion, eroticism, intellectualism, and virtuosity in Strauss’s operas. Required of all second-year D.M.A. students.

  
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    DRMUS 912 — Analysis for Performers

    2 credits
    Spring
    Steven Laitz

    Implications for performance of melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic-contrapuntal analysis. Interpretive problems of works in various media are illuminated by examining insights gained through the application of analytical methods, primarily those of Schenker. Recordings and classroom performances provide material for critical listening and for practical demonstration of the ideas put forward. Required of all second-year D.M.A. students.

Liberal Arts Core

  
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    LARTS 101-2 — Writing Seminar

    6 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty

    This course is a prerequisite to LARTS 111. Emphasis is placed upon reading and writing skills, verbal expression, and critical analysis of texts. Successful completion satisfies six Liberal Arts Elective credits. Students are expected to receive a grade of “C” or higher in the second semester in order to receive credit and continue in the Liberal Arts Core. Students may qualify out of this course on the basis of a diagnostic exam which evaluates their preparedness.
  
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    LARTS 111 — Ethics - Conscience and the Good Life

    3 credits
    Fall
    Faculty

    Prerequisite: LARTS 101-2 . Students read and discuss works of ethicists, philosophers, religious figures, and literary authors on the nature of the ethical life. Students will be encouraged to think critically about personal responsibility, responsibilities to others, the good life, the problem of evil, and human nature. Authors and traditions that may be included: Classical Greek and Roman, Buddhism, Taoism, the Hebrew and Christian Bibles, Hume, Kant, Utilitarianism, Mary Shelley, and Shakespeare, as well as contemporary readings that address the ethical questions arising in a scientific, technological and global age.
  
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    LARTS 112 — Society, Politics, and Culture

    3 credits
    Spring
    Faculty

    This course is an introduction to the seminal issues, methods, and traditions that inform historical and contemporary conceptions of politics, society, and culture. Drawing from classical to contemporary readings in political theory, philosophy, the social sciences, literature, and gender studies, the course encourages students to explore such topics as why people live in society; how social life influences personhood; how society regulates and institutionalizes power and authority; and how societies are transformed. Authors who may be included are Plato, Aristotle, Locke, Marx, Mill, Wollstonecraft, and Woolf.
  
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    LARTS 212 — Citizenship, Art, and Politics

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
    Faculty

    Prerequisite: LARTS 112 From the moment that creators share their work with the public, these works take on new meanings. Students enrolled in Citizenship, Art, and Politics will consider problems of abiding interest and frequent disagreement: Who gets to decide what is art, and what sort of conclusions have been reached? When appraising a performance, should audiences take an artist’s personal qualities into account? Are artists obligated to consider for whom a performance is given, or where it is performed, or should artists simply focus on the performance itself? What are governments’ interests in creative expression? During times of social or political conflict, what are the limits and possibilities of cultural diplomacy?

     


Liberal Arts Electives: Humanities (Art History)

  
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    LARTS 340 — Frozen Music: On Interrelating the Arts

    3 credits
    Fall
    Greta Berman and Samuel Zyman

    Prerequisite: LARTS 112  Architecture has sometimes been called frozen music. This course begins in 16th-century Venice, where the architecture and opulent setting help illuminate Venetian music, and especially the blossoming of opera in that city. We will start by looking at Palladio’s architecture, the paintings of Titian, Veronese, and Tintoretto, and the music of Gabrieli and Monteverdi. We will continue through the mid-19th century in France. The course focuses on important art and music of the periods. Using slides, musical demonstrations, and recordings, we will examine many moments in time and places where art and music come together.
  
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    LARTS 343 — Art of the 19th Century

    3 credits
    Fall
    Greta Berman

    In this class we will study painting, sculpture, and architecture in Europe from the end of the 18th century to the beginning of the 20th century. Topics include Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, Symbolism, Post-Impressionism, and Art Nouveau. Students will be introduced to the works of David, Ingres, Delacroix, Turner, Goya, Courbet, Degas, Monet, Van Gogh, and Toulouse-Lautrec, among others.
  
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    LARTS 346 — Art of the United States

    3 credits
    Spring
    Greta Berman

    This class will examine some of the reasons for the artistic progress of the United States from British colony to leader of the avant-garde. In doing so, we will take a chronological look at paintings, sculpture, and architecture. This nation began its existence by looking to Europe for its inspiration, but after World War II, New York City replaced Paris as the center of the art world. We shall take advantage of New York City’s thriving and ever-changing status as leader of the avant-garde in the visual arts as well as our physical location in this city to visit museums and galleries, and supplement our knowledge by means of digital slides.
  
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    LARTS 348 — Opera: Music and the Visual Arts

    3 credits
    Spring
    Greta Berman

    This team-taught course will focus on a selection of operas, exploring a few of the many connections between that art form and the visual arts. Among the operas we will examine are Monteverdi’s Orfeo, one or two of Handel’s numerous works, Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas, as well as operas by Mozart, Verdi, Puccini, and Wagner. Debussy’s Pelléas et Mélisande, Richard Strauss’s Salome, Schoenberg’s Moses und Aron, and Hindemith’s Mathis der Mahler — unique in that the composer based it on the life and work of the 16th-century German painter, Mathias Grünewald — all have special relevance to visual art. We will look at these through a variety of approaches: thematic as well as stylistic. Some of the painters whose work corresponds to the composers include Nicolas Poussin, Gustave Moreau, Odilon Redon, Paul Klee, and Wassily Kandinsky.
  
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    LARTS 349 — Art of the Renaissance

    3 credits
    Spring
    Greta Berman

    Prerequisite: LARTS 112  This class looks at painting, sculpture, and architecture of the Renaissance. By means of slides, lectures, and class discussions, we explore the meaning of the Renaissance and its manifestations in Italy and Northern Europe. Major artists include Giotto, Piero della Francesca, Fra Angelico, Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Michelangelo, Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden, and Hieronymus Bosch.

Liberal Arts Electives: Humanities (Literature and Creative Writing)

  
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    LARTS 315 — Writing Poetry and Flash Fiction

    3 credits
    Spring
    Ron Price

    Prerequisite: LARTS 112  Designed to help students recognize options rather than flaws in what they write, this course will focus on how language works at its most evocative — in poetry, prose poems, and short stories. The aim is to generate material and to find appropriate forms to contain that material by identifying the musical and rhythmic shape of words. The semester comprises writing exercises, critiques, and discussions of related issues: the image, spoken language, syntax, music, tone, story, and form. Students will develop writing, editorial, and performance skills — the emphasis being on how to use those tools to enhance the expression of experience.
  
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    LARTS 357 — War and Literature

    3 credits
    Spring
    Ron Price

     

    This course explores the history of warfare, collective violence, religious and military strategies for conducting war, and efforts to wage humane wars. After an introduction to warfare in the ancient world, we will consider “just war” theories and changing representations of war up to the 21st century in essays, films, letters, memoirs, novels, plays, and poetry. The course is chronological and thematic, dealing with a variety of issues: What are the lures of war? How have other cultures thought about war? What drives a soldier? Can war be controlled or eliminated? What strategies have been brought to the table to answer these questions? Using an interdisciplinary approach, we will investigate these and other issues through the works of writers from differing historical eras, regions of the world, and cultural perspectives. There will be, as well, an ongoing discussion of what constitutes a canon of texts in such an area of study: why do these texts matter? Texts include The Iliad, The Art of War, and more contemporary literature.

     

  
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    LARTS 359 — English Romantic Literature of the 19th Century: Sublime, Gothic, Heroic

    3 credits
    Spring
    Jo Sarzotti

    This course takes as its subject the literary art generated by English and American writers in the years 1780 to 1830, known as the “Romantic period” and characterized by enthusiasm for the imagination, the power of nature, and belief in boundless possibility for human achievement, including the supernatural. We will start in the 17th century with the origins of the Gothic tradition, reading Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey and poetry by Coleridge, Byron, and Keats. Then we take up Burke’s idea of the Sublime, reading parts of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, the first Vampire story, and poetry by Wordsworth, Percy Shelley, and others. We finish by reading stories by E.A. Poe and Bram Stoker’s Dracula as well as looking at contemporary versions of the supernatural in film.
 

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