Oct 23, 2021  
College Catalog 2019-2020 
    
College Catalog 2019-2020 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

All Courses


 

Keyboard Studies

  
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    KSMUS 001-2 — Keyboard Sight-Reading

    0 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty

    This practicum trains the student in the art of sight-reading piano scores. Emphasis is placed on approaching scores with an eye toward musicality, including articulation, phrasing, and dynamics. Rapid identification of rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic patterns is stressed. Students will sight-read diverse musical styles, including contrapuntal works, sonatas from the late 18th century, harmonically complex works from the 19th century, and non-tonal works. May be required as a result of placement exam.
  
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    KSMUS 111-2 — Keyboard Skills I

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty

    This course develops facility and musicianship skills at the keyboard. Areas under study include: realization of figured bass lines with a given soprano; harmonization of simple chorale melodies; composition of simple harmonic progressions; introductions to alto, tenor, and soprano clefs using two-, three-, and four-part exercises and repertoire; and transposition of 19th-century lieder up and down half-steps and whole-steps. Required of all keyboard majors.
  
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    KSMUS 141 — Piano Class I

    1 credit
    Fall, Spring
    Jennifer Chu and Fellows

    Designed for students who have had very little or no prior experience in piano, the course will allow students to develop familiarity with the five-finger position and basic keyboard harmony, as well as simple repertoire. Required of all non-keyboard majors.
  
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    KSMUS 142 — Piano Class II

    1 credit
    Fall, Spring
    Jennifer Chu and Teaching Fellows

    Prerequisite: KSMUS 141 A continuation of Piano Class I, this course will allow students to broaden their pianistic skills while developing finger and hand independence. Among the skills to be mastered are full-octave scales, harmonization of melodies, chord progressions in keyboard style, and repertoire that involves shifting positions and various left hand accompaniment patterns. Required of all non-keyboard majors.
  
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    KSMUS 211 — Keyboard Skills II

    2 credits
    Fall
    Faculty

    Prerequisite: KSMUS 111-2 . With the focus now on chromatic harmonies and complex modulations, this course continues the study of all topics introduced in Keyboard Skills I. Areas under study include: realization of figured bass lines without a given soprano; composition of progressions with chromatic harmonies and distant modulations; reduction of three- and four-part scores utilizing varying clefs; an introduction to orchestral transpositions and prepared reduction of symphonies and concertos by Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven; and transposition of 19th-century lieder up and down varying intervals. Required of all keyboard majors.
  
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    KSMUS 222 — Advanced Keyboard Skills

    2 credits
    Spring
    Faculty

    Prerequisite:

      

    The final phase of the keyboard skills sequence, advanced keyboard skills courses are offered in the following specialized categories:

     

    Classical-Era Ornamentation and Improvisation
    This course develops fluidity and comfort with stylistic ornamentation and improvisation. Students will explore Classical-Era patterns of figuration, ornamentation, harmonic progressions, and compositional techniques, as a means to create and improvise small forms, such as preludes, fantasies and cadenzas in the style of C P E Bach, Mozart, Haydn, and Beethoven. The use of harpsichord and fortepiano will be included, per availability. As a final project, students will create a cadenza for a Mozart piano concerto.

     

    Techniques in Vocal Collaboration
    In this Advanced Keyboard Skills elective course, students will explore the art song repertoire and develop techniques for working with singers, including an understanding of vocal technique as it relates to breathing; sensitivity and communication during performance; rehearsal techniques; basic diction; and poetic interpretation of vocal texts. Students will work regularly with singers in class and learn how to both sight-read songs and prepare them for performance. Works studied will be primarily drawn from the art song repertoire (Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, Fauré, Debussy, and others) but will also include an introduction to the operatic repertoire.

     

    Piano Improvisation
    This course will train students in the art of improvising in a wide range of styles from the 18th to 21st centuries. Students will develop compositional thinking, harmonic imagination, melodic creativity, and textural exploration.

     

    Techniques in Contemporary Piano Music
    In this Advanced Keyboard Skills elective course, students will develop techniques for approaching contemporary piano music, including rhythmic exercises, inside-piano strategies, and improvisation in context. The course will explore a wide range of contemporary piano repertoire with varied aesthetics, from the 1920s to the present, including solo, two-piano, and four-hand works, as well as excerpts from notable chamber music and orchestral piano parts. Repertoire covered ranges from the classic modernist composers Ives, Schoenberg, and Stravinsky, to more recent pieces by George Crumb, György Ligeti, György Kurtág, Frederic Rzewski, Amy Williams, Du Yun, and Dai Fujikura. Class sessions will include informal student performances.

  
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    KSMUS 241 — Piano Class III

    1 credit
    Fall, Spring
    Jennifer Chu and Fellows

    Prerequisite: KSMUS 142 A continuation of Piano Class II, this course expands upon the student’s piano technique, introducing new scale and arpeggio fingerings, and presenting chord progressions with chromatic chords. Students will continue to develop facility at the keyboard through study of etudes and short pieces in a variety of styles. Required of all non-keyboard majors.
  
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    KSMUS 242 — Piano Class IV

    1 credit
    Fall, Spring
    Jennifer Chu and Teaching Fellows

    Prerequisite: KSMUS 241 The final course in the piano sequence will reinforce the cumulative skills and techniques learned so far with an aim to develop further dexterity and fluency. Students will be playing intermediate-level pieces with a variety of textures, be well versed in scales, arpeggios, and chord progressions in all keys, and be able to harmonize melodies and sight read comfortably. Students will undertake repertoire and skill projects that they feel will be useful in their future careers as performers and teachers. Required of all non-keyboard majors.
  
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    KSMUS 501-2 — Practical Techniques for Service Playing

    2 credits
    Not offered for 2016-2017
    Faculty

    A comprehensive survey of the skills necessary to play the organ in church, adapting the organist’s performance ability to the church setting, where many organists are employed. Hymn-playing: musical leadership, breathing, free harmonization, interludes, bicinium, canon, fugue. Plainsong: accompanying plainsong hymns and psalms. Psalmody: Anglican chant, responsorial psalms. Choral accompaniment: ensemble, registration, period techniques, orchestral transcriptions from vocal score. Voluntaries: repertoire choice, sensitivity. Service music: traditional and contemporary.
  
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    KSMUS 511-2X — Keyboard Skills IxIIx

    0 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty

    This course combines the essential elements of Keyboard Skills I and II into a robust two-semester sequence. Areas under study include: realization of figured bass lines; composition of complex harmonic progressions; reduction of three- and four-part scores utilizing varying clefs; an introduction to orchestral transpositions and prepared reduction of symphonies by Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven; and transposition of 19th-century lieder up and down minor seconds and thirds. For graduate students only.

Music Theory and Analysis

  
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    THMUS H111 — Honors Theory I: Aspects of Form and Structure

    4 credits
    Fall
    Steven Laitz

    This course offers an advanced review of diatonic tonal harmony, with an emphasis on integrating the vertical and horizontal perspectives and interpreting ambiguous passages. Analytical studies focus on matters of form in Baroque and Classical music, drawing from historical and recent paradigms for form analysis. A musicianship component develops aural awareness and fluency with applied harmony at the keyboard. By advisement only.
  
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    THMUS H211 — Honors Theory II: Chromatic Harmony and Analysis I

    4 credits
    Spring
    Steven Laitz

    Prerequisite: THMUS H111 . This course presents an advanced study of chromatic techniques of the late-18th and 19th centuries, including modal mixture, augmented-sixth chords, enharmonic reinterpretation, and common-tone modulation. Analysis of selected compositions drawn primarily from the first half of the 19th century, including music by Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Schubert, and Schumann. The musicianship component continues, with an emphasis on chromatic harmonies.
  
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    THMUS H311 — Honors Theory III: Chromatic Harmony and Analysis II

    4 credits
    Fall
    Loretta Terrigno

    Prerequisite: THMUS H211 . This course examines tonal trends of the late-19th and early-20th centuries that led to the breakdown of the traditional tonal system. A central theme is the tension between “traditional” and “progressive” in 19th-century tonal practice, exploring how composers expanded and recast conventional harmonic practice during this period. Topics include the symmetrical division of the octave, chromatic-mediant relationships, altered dominants, diminished-seventh and common-tone augmented-sixth chords, chromatic sequences, expanded tonality, extended tertian harmony, and added-note sonorities. Emphasis is placed on the music of Brahms, Chopin, Liszt, Mahler, Ravel, Strauss, and Wolf.
  
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    THMUS H411 — Honors Theory IV: Counterpoint and Analytical Methods

    4 credits
    Spring
    Loretta Terrigno

    Prerequisite: THMUS H311 . Honors Theory IV will continue the study of species counterpoint, beginning with single species counterpoint in three parts, followed by the study of combined species. Beyond the stylistic constraints of emulating 16th-century counterpoint, writing three-part species counterpoint provides secure training in handling the interplay of consonance and dissonance. In doing so, it has important ramifications in understanding complex voice-leading configurations, and thus provides a secure basis in understanding the language of tonal music in general. This course will also offer an introduction to Schenkerian Analysis. Through the study of the voice-leading and tonal organization of selected compositions, the course will aim to develop an understanding of large-scale musical coherence employing the analytic system of graphic notation developed by Heinrich Schenker. Through the analytic techniques learned in this course, students will gain a deeper understanding of how the principles of harmony and counterpoint operate in tandem, and determine the criteria for structural coherence in music of the common-practice period. Beginning with short extracts and themes, complete works will be analyzed by the end of the semester. 

     

     

  
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    THMUS H511 — Honors Theory V: Music of the 20th Century and Beyond

    4 credits
    Fall
    Jonathan Dawe

    Prerequisite: THMUS H411   This course presents a survey of analytical approaches for post-tonal music from Modernism to the present day, and consists of three major units: 1) the rise of new scales and referential collections, such as new uses of modes, pentatonic, non-functional diatonic, whole-tone, octatonic, and “synthetic” collections; 2) pitch structures, including the study of set theory conventions, classical 12-tone methods, and the concept of pitch centricity; and 3) musical processes and design in music after 1950, including integral serialism, Neo-Romanticism, minimalism, process music, spectralism, and intercultural music. 
  
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    THMUS 111 — Theory I: Diatonic Harmony

    3 credits
    Fall
    Faculty

    This course provides an introduction to the theory and analysis of tonal music. After a review of musical fundamentals (in which students will be expected to demonstrate facility and speed in naming and spelling basic tonal materials), the course will introduce species counterpoint, diatonic harmony, and the composition and analysis of idiomatic musical phrases typical of the Baroque or Classical style.
  
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    THMUS 211 — Theory II: Principles of Form

    3 credits
    Spring
    Faculty

    Prerequisite: THMUS 111 . This course examines principles of formal structure from the smallest phrase units to complete movements in binary and da capo forms. These principles are illuminated through the analysis of examples drawn from music literature of the 18th and 19th centuries, as well as through model-composition assignments.
  
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    THMUS 311 — Theory III: Chromatic Harmony and Analysis

    3 credits
    Fall
    Faculty

    Prerequisite: THMUS 211 . This course introduces large-scale forms (sonata form, rondo, and ternary) as well as principles of chromatic harmony. An emphasis is placed on the expressive meaning of chromatic harmonies and also on the use of chromatic features in complete, large-scale movements. Analytical and model-composition projects draw from the Classical repertoire (especially sonata forms) and representative, early 19th-century genres (such as Lieder and character pieces).
  
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    THMUS 411 — Theory IV: At Tonality’s Edge

    3 credits
    Spring
    Faculty

    Prerequisite: THMUS 311 . The course examines later 19th- and early 20th-century trends that contributed to the breakdown of traditional tonality around 1900, and the ensuing rise of new tonalities. An ongoing theme in this course is developing a working definition of “tonality” and the tension between harmonic and contrapuntal aspects of music.
  
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    THMUS 511 — Theory V: 20th Century and Beyond

    3 credits
    Fall
    Faculty

    Prerequisite: THMUS 411 . This course offers a broad introduction to the analysis of post-tonal music. Topics of study include extended tonality and the rise of new tonalities; scales and collections; and principles of set theory and classic serialism.

Music Theory: Electives

  
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    THMUS E514 — The Well-Tempered Clavier: A Musical Treatise on Composition

    3 creduts
    Fall
    Philip Lasser

    Prerequisite: THMUS 511  
  
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    THMUS E522 — Nationalism in 19th-Century Chamber Music

    3 credits
    Spring
    Eric Ewazen

    Prerequisite:  . One of the distinctive movements of the 19th century was Nationalism — as composers from various European countries celebrated their national and cultural origins. In this course, nationalistic elements of a variety of distinctive composers will be explored and contrasted. We will look at chamber music for various instrumental combinations, including the brass quintets of Victor Ewald (Russia), the string ensemble works of Dvořák (Czechoslovak region), and the piano chamber works of Granados (Spain) and Chopin (Poland), as well as the art songs of Fauré (France) and Tchaikovsky (Russia). We will examine the distinctive harmonic languages and idiosyncrasies and the use of folk and textural elements that distinguish these composers, marking them as true nationalists.
  
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    THMUS E526 — Brahms and Wagner: Two Paths in 19th-Century German Music

    3 credits
    Spring
    Eric Ewazen

    Prerequisite:  . The two polar opposites of 19th-century German music: The Neo-Classical works of Brahms, built upon the grand traditions of classical forms, structure, and aesthetic, combined with the evolving chromatic harmonies is a culmination of the history of classical concert music up until that time. It paved the way for future generations of Neo-Classicists, who both honored and explored the music of the past, and who were inspired to find ways to make the music current and fresh. Wagner’s conscious exploration of revolutionary approaches to harmony and structure, totally altering the structures of traditional Classical and early 19th-century operas, also broke ground for future generations to exult in exploration and change. The influential and fascinating approaches of Brahms and Wagner inspired future generations of composers to explore these two contrasting paths. Great works by both composers will be examined and compared.
  
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    THMUS E528 — The Art Song From Schubert to Rorem

    3 credits
    Spring
    Michelle DiBucci

    Prerequisite:  . Beginning with the Elizabethan lute songs of John Dowland, extending through the masters of German Lieder (e.g. Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, and Wolf), and continuing through the present, this course examines the evolution of the song as an art form. Special emphasis will be given to the relationship between text and music, cultural influences, interpretation, and style. The curriculum will include general analysis, comparative analyses of settings of the same text by different composers, analysis of a song and its later arrangement as an instrumental work, and several composition assignments exploring the setting of text.
  
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    THMUS E537 — The Symphonies of Beethoven and Brahms

    3 credits
    Spring
    Behzad Ranjbaran

    Prerequisite: THMUS 511 . An analytical study of select symphonies of Beethoven and Brahms is pursued partly in the context of Classicism and its continuation into the Romantic period. Juxtaposition of these major works highlights two trends: (1) Beethoven’s attempt to expand his musical language beyond Classical aesthetics and (2) Brahms’s honoring of Classical values at the height of Romanticism. This course will explore the impact of these composers’ social and artistic environments on their respective musical characteristics. In addition, we will touch upon the immense impact of their works on symphonic music.
  
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    THMUS E538 — A Wild Ride: Music of the Late 20th-Century from Messiaen to Golijov

    3 credits
    Spring
    Samuel Zyman

    Prerequisite: THMUS 511 . Works by Messiaen, Boulez, Carter, Ligeti, Berio, Lutoslawski, Corigliano, Schnittke, Adams, Golijov (and possibly others) will be analyzed and discussed.

     

  
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    THMUS E541 — The Art of Tonal Counterpoint

    3 credits
    Spring
    Kendall Briggs

    Prerequisite: THMUS 511  .This course will explore the art of counterpoint as practiced by composers from the Baroque through the end of the 19th century focusing on the relationship between harmonic and contrapuntal practice often separated in theory. Students will learn how Bach and those who followed him created their intricate counterpoints as well as learn easily to create their own works, including canons, inventions, suites, passacaglias, and chaconnes. The course will focus on both analysis and composition.
  
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    THMUS E545 — The World of 20th/21st-Century Tonal Music

    3 credits
    Fall
    Eric Ewazen

    Prerequisite: THMUS 511  An examination of the wide variety of tonality in contemporary music, exploring the beautiful, rich, and expanded tonal music of Copland in his classic ballets, Barber in his art songs and chamber music, Hindemith in his sonatas and chamber music, Ives in his symphonies, and Gershwin and Bernstein in their jazz-influenced compositions. We also look at Prokofiev’s and Bartók’s use of Eastern European tonality and Britten’s polytonality in his operas. The music of these composers, which stems from traditional major and minor scales, blossoms into a world of varied languages that becomes a kaleidescope of colorful tonality.
  
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    THMUS E546 — Developing Variation: From Beethoven to Schoenberg

    3 credits
    Spring
    Jonathan Dawe

    Prerequisite: THMUS 511 . The transformation of motive, melody, and theme are explored as a significant compositional procedure that developed over the centuries. The concepts of developing variation, transformation theory, and non-tonal motivic analysis are presented in a survey involving music of Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Wager, Liszt, and Schoenberg.
  
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    THMUS E547 — Classicism in Music: 1830-1930

    3 credits
    Fall
    Eric Ewazen

    Prerequisite: THMUS 511  
  
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    THMUS E549 — The Intersection of Vocal and Instrumental Music

    3
    Spring
    Eric Ewazen

    Prerequisite:THMUS 511  
  
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    THMUS E550 — Late Surge: Janáček’s Last Decade

    3 credits
    Spring
    Thomas Cabaniss

    Prerequisite: THMUS 511  In his last decade, Leoš Janáček was on fire. He turned out one masterpiece after another, including the operas Katya Kabanova, The Cunning Little Vixen, The Makropulos Affair, and From the House of the Dead; the orchestral Sinfonietta; two brilliant string quartets; and The Glagolitic Mass. Students will study and analyze these works with an emphasis on understanding his use of speechlike rhythms and cumulative motivic repetition. The class culminates in an analytical paper as its final project.
  
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    THMUS E553-4 — Advanced Counterpoint

    6 credits
    Full Year
    Philip Lasser

    THMUS 511  Is a prerequisite for this course. An intensive course devoted to studying the contrapuntal nature of music. Counterpoint is treated here not as a historical, style-based study, but rather as a fundamental controlling force in the syntax of Western music. The class is designed as a rigorous seminar with weekly written assignments on topics ranging from species to fully invertible counterpoint, and from canon to fugue. Concurrently, works from the Middle Ages through the 20th century will be analyzed for their underlying contrapuntal organization. Required of all undergraduate Composition majors.
  
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    THMUS E555-6 — Advanced Studies in Harmony

    6 credits
    Full Year
    Philip Lasser

    THMUS 511  An advanced course examining the harmonic principals of the tonal language and their evolution through history. Based on Nadia Boulanger’s method, the class involves extensive written and aural work on chorale harmonizations from triads to ninth chords, with special emphasis on doublings and chord spacings. Work evolves gradually from diatonic to chromatic. Analysis of music from all periods will also be covered, stressing harmonic issues as key elements of style and compositional organization. Required of all undergraduate Composition majors.
  
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    THMUS E570 — Stravinsky in America

    3 credits
    Fall
    Kendall Briggs

    Prerequisite: THMUS 511  Stravinsky’s move to America in 1939 was to be one of the most important in his life. It was in America that Stravinsky’s most important compositional changes and developments occurred. This course will chart these developments, focusing on the influences of numerous individuals he met in America on these compositional choices and stylistic directions, particularly those of Robert Craft, W. H. Auden, George Balanchine, Aldous Huxley, and Dylan Thomas, among many others. Particular attention will focus on his neo-Classic style and use of traditional musical forms, harmony, and counterpoint; the influence of jazz styles; as well as his work toward a new and unique use of the concepts of serialism after the death of Schoenberg. Analysis of works will focus on Stravinsky’s novel use of form, instrumentation, harmony, and counterpoint in these styles. Assignments will include comparative summaries of topics discussed as well as a final document, which will focus on a specific topic or a comparison of various topics.

Music History

  
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    MHMUS 111 — From Antiquity to 1700

    3 credits
    Spring
    Faculty

    The first semester of a three-semester study of the history of music, designed for first-year students in their spring semester. Topics to include life and art in the Middle Ages, Gregorian chant, beginnings of polyphony, Ars nova, Renaissance culture and art, music of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation, the age of the madrigal, early opera, and the Baroque 17th century.
  
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    MHMUS 211 — From 1700 to 1850

    3 credits
    Fall
    Faculty

    Prerequisite: MHMUS 111 . The second semester of a three-semester study of the history of music, designed for sophomores. Topics to include the Late Baroque era, music of the French court, Baroque concerto and opera, the rise of instrumental music, Classicism and the First Viennese School, the French Revolution, Romanticism in France and Germany, songs and piano music, Romantic opera before Wagner.
  
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    MHMUS 311 — From 1850 to the Present

    3 credits
    Spring
    Faculty

    Prerequisite: MHMUS 211 . The third semester of a three-semester study of the history of music, designed for sophomores. Topics to include operas of Verdi and Wagner, Late Romanticism and Post-Romanticism, the rise of Modernism, French Impressionism, the Second Viennese School, new styles and “isms” of the 20th century, jazz and popular music in the concert hall, world wars and the Cold War, avant-gardism, music in the 21st century.

Music History: Electives

  
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    MHMUS H444 — German Nationalism and Classical Music

    3 credits
    Spring
    Jonathan Yaeger

    Prerequisite: MHMUS 311 . This course will address the emergence of modern German national identity in the wake of the French Revolution. Readings will trace the history of Germany from approximately 1800 to today, and pieces of music will illuminate the historical issues. This is a Music History Honors course, students pursuing graduation with academic honors may use this course to fulfill one of the requirements.
  
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    MHMUS 409 — Medieval Music and the Modern Imagination

    3 credits
    Fall
    Jonathan Yaeger

    Prerequisite: MHMUS 311 . Composers and musicologists have long been fascinated by the music of the Middle Ages. Such interest dates to the Romantic era and its reaction against Enlightenment rationalism in favor of the “age of Faith.” Since 1800, many canonic and popular pieces have borrowed or referenced medieval music, including Wagner’s Tannhäuser, Liszt’s and Bruckner’s choral music, Orff’s Carmina Burana, and works of the spiritual or “holy” minimalists Arvo Pärt and John Tavener. We will study these modern pieces along with the original sources of inspiration, i.e. Wagner’s opera alongside the songs of the German Minnesinger, Kaija Saariaho’s L’amour de loin in conjunction with troubadour song. We will investigate the ways in which medieval music has been re-imagined in the industrial and now post-industrial worlds, and consider how such re-imaginings convey modern musicians’ own epochs.
  
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    MHMUS 413 — C.P.E. Bach, Frederick the Great, and the Enlightenment Court

    3 credits
    Spring
    Martin Verdrager

    Prerequisite: MHMUS 311 . The year 2014 marks the 300th anniversary of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach’s birth. The second surviving son of J. S. Bach, Emanuel Bach would become one of the most creative composers of the early Classical period. From 1738 until 1768, he worked at the court of Frederick the Great, who was just two years older than Emanuel. A remarkable military strategist, Frederick wrote of his experience and ken in an influential treatise. C. P. E. Bach wrote a significant tract about keyboard performance and methodology. Frederick attracted many of the leading figures of the Enlightenment. Emanuel collected portraits of the most important musicians of his time and corresponded with them. Frederick’s politics helped spur Germany into unification nearly 60 years after his death, and he remained a hero to Germans until the days of WWII. Emanuel helped turn the tide of the style galant towards more introspective realms of harmonic and melodic thinking; his novel empfindsamer Stil (sensitive style) works inspired composers from Haydn to Richard Strauss. The class will examine the substance of C. P. E. Bach’s and Frederick’s lives and musical works through class performances, oral projects, and short essays about 18th-century music, poetry, the substance of Enlightenment, painting, and the beginnings of musical biography.
  
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    MHMUS 425 — Eighteenth-Century Works, Sources, and Contexts

    3 credits
    Spring
    Frederic Fehleisen

    Prerequiste:MHMUS 311  This course explores three major 18th-century works—J. S. Bach’s St. Matthew Passion, Handel’s Messiah, and Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro—and the documentary evidence that defines their musical and cultural contexts, thus offering students opportunities to expand their artistic knowledge, develop new skills, and enrich their outlook. In each case, students will analyze the composer’s manuscripts, early handwritten copies, and prints, as well as survey recent scholarly literature. During these explorations, students will learn to “read” handwritten sources and printed editions, and how to find their way through changing versions that were created by the composers. Requirements will include several short papers and analytical studies of sources, and, in the case of the first two works, students will have the unique opportunity of working with both autograph scores and complete sets of original performing parts.
  
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    MHMUS 427 — Music and Revolution

    3 credits
    Fall
    Joel Sachs

    Prerequisite: MHMUS 311  
  
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    MHMUS 429 — National and Cosmopolitan Styles in the Baroque

    3 credits
    Fall
    Lynette Bowring

    Prerequisite: MHMUS 311  The first half of the semester will consist of an in-depth discussion of the distinctive national styles that formed in the 17th century in Italy, France, Germany, and England, as well as the historical and social factors that shaped these individual styles. Building on this framework, the second half of the semester will proceed to explore the various ways in which these musical styles and musicians of different nationalities intersected and influenced each other throughout the Baroque period, including exploration of the concept of the goûts-réunis (the “reunited styles”) and cities that promoted a cosmopolitan musical environment. A range of representative compositions will be studied throughout the course, including pieces from the major national styles and selected works by composers such as Bach, Telemann, and Couperin.

  
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    MHMUS 439 — Mozart’s Narrative Art

    3 credits
    Fall
    Fredric Fehleisen

    Prerequisite: MHMUS 311  In this course, students will explore musical works by Mozart and other late-18th-century composers through the lenses of musical grammar, rhetoric, and associated narrative approaches. Students will thereby gain a practical understanding of the world of musical figures, topics, and new, innovative techniques that grew out of them. Students will then delve into specific musical works in search of “stories” that might be found in them and later retold in performances of them. Students will have individual opportunities to present their studies in written form, as well as through in-class oral presentations and musical performances. The course will encompass a survey of readings from readily available texts and will incorporate recent scholarship as well. 

  
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    MHMUS 442 — 33 Variations on Beethoven

    3 credits
    Spring
    Anne-Marie Reynolds

     

    Prerequisite: MHMUS 311 .This course’s title is taken from the play by Moisés Kaufman, which in turn refers to Beethoven’s 33 Variations on a Theme of Anton Diabelli. This semester, our theme will be “Why Beethoven?” Why the ceaseless fascination, sometimes bordering on obsession, with this now decomposing artist? The answer will become clear only as the course unfolds, just as the significance of Diabelli’s theme to Beethoven’s 33 Variations is revealed only as the piece progresses. Musicologist William Kinderman regards the recurrences of Diabelli’s theme in the variations as parodies. After first surveying Beethoven’s oeuvre, we too will be studying Beethoven “parodies”—that is, the various images of the composer and his music that, since his death, have been created and promoted to various—sometimes contradictory—cultural and political ends. Kinderman also sees a large-scale progression spanning the Diabelli Variations as a whole. Hopefully an analogous overriding unity will become clear through our mission to understand all things Beethoven this semester, so that we may ultimately arrive at an informed and nuanced answer to the question “Why Beethoven?”

  
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    MHMUS 452 — Music on the Edge Since 1900

    3 credits
    Spring
    Martin Verdrager

    Prerequisite: MHMUS 311 . This course explores the many musical genres and styles that have crossed paths in the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st. More than at any previous time, the boundaries of traditional, popular, and classical aesthetics are now meeting and blending, forming new ways of composing and hearing. Students will examine how 20th-century music gradually adopted and altered the sounds and symbols of folk music, classic traditions, modernism, blues, world music, futurism, jazz, pop, rock, and the culture of “the other.” Music has been included in or adopted into the principles of related arts; shared forms such as cinema, performance art, kinetic sculpture, acoustics, and sound art have expanded the use and purpose of music. Students will be asked to read articles about the changes in aesthetics and conditions of music’s place in the modern, postmodern, and post-postmodern world, perform or find examples, and discuss music that exemplifies the historic and new aesthetics of our musical art. Two major oral projects are required, each with a written summary and bibliography. 
  
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    MHMUS 453 — Modernism in Opera

    3 credits
    Fall
    Anne-Marie Reynolds

    Prerequisite: MHMUS 311 . This course will consider 20th-century opera in relation to the Modernist movement and the attendant historical, social, political, and technological developments, and how it both reflected and shaped its time. At the turn of the 20th century, the world was generally viewed as a complex organism, moving toward its own perfection; the 20th century promised to be an improved version of the 19th. But perhaps sooner than anyone else, the artists (painters, writers, musicians) saw through the patina of well-being to the disillusionment and dissatisfaction beneath, and had the strongest premonitions of catastrophe. Artists felt they had a role to play in society that transcended simply creating something beautiful: they sought to uncover truths about their times at all costs, and to save humanity from spiritual decay. In addition to listening and viewing, we will learn about the operas studied (such as Wozzeck, Pelléas et Mélisande, Peter Grimes, and The Rake’s Progress) from reading what observers both past and present, including the creators themselves, had to say about their purpose and impact.
  
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    MHMUS 455 — The Arts in the Third Reich

    3 credits
    Fall
    Anne-Marie Reynolds

    Prerequisite: MHMUS 311 . This course addresses the crucial role the arts played in the Nazis’ rise to power, in the persecution of their victims, in acts of resistance, and, all too rarely, in their victims’ salvation. We will begin by considering how the arts—especially music—have long defined Germany’s identity generally, and then turn to the role they played in the Nazis’ grand scheme specifically, focusing on the various ways that the arts were used as propaganda, and how the same works functioned as statements of protest for their victims. To personalize what we learn, we will study select artists (including musicians, painters, actors, and film directors), whose lives, careers, and creative efforts were destroyed by the Nazis. Through reading, listening, viewing, and writing, we will come to understand the contradictory extent to which the Nazis both revered and feared the power of the arts. Finally, we will reflect on how the arts still serve as instruments of persuasion and resistance today, and how what we’ve learned might inform the choices we make in our own lives. 
  
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    MHMUS 458 — New Currents From Asia

    3 credits
    Spring
    Joel Sachs

    Prerequisite: MHMUS 311 . This course examines the music of Asian composers since the mid-20th century with a sampling of compositions from China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, and other countries that have become lively participants in the now-global world of concert music. Students will give individual presentations, investigating how these composers do or do not employ elements of their national traditions. 
  
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    MHMUS 464 — The Requiem

    3 credits
    Spring
    John J.H. Muller

     

    Prerequisite: MHMUS 311 . The subject of death has often drawn from composers their most eloquent music. This course will examine Requiem settings throughout music history. As a starting point, we will study the Gregorian plainchant Requiem and its relationship to the liturgy of the Catholic Mass. This will lead to chant-based polyphonic settings of the Renaissance, including those of Ockeghem and Victoria. Fact and fiction surrounding Mozart’s unfinished Requiem will be addressed. The awesome portrayal of the Day of Judgment found in the Requiems of Berlioz and Verdi will be contrasted with the more intimate approach of Fauré. Settings by Duruflé and Ligeti offer examples of the diversity of 20th-century style. Non-liturgical works such as Brahms’s Ein Deutsches Requiem and Britten’s War Requiem will also be examined. Throughout the course, issues of structural coherence and tone-painting will be considered, as will the attitudes toward death and religion reflected in a composer’s works.

  
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    MHMUS 473 — History of English Music

    3 credits
    Fall
    Martin Verdrager

    Prerequisite: MHMUS 311 .For nearly two millennia England has produced some of the most affecting music that influenced composers on the continent of Europe and the rest of the world. This class will explore the historic background and musical works from the medieval period through the beginnings of our own century. England was a unique exporter and importer of composers and musical styles, a founding voice in music scholarship, and in the 20th century, a leader in the revival of early music. Each class member will be asked to read works about English and music history plus an important work of English literature. Additionally, students will choose a work to perform in class—mainly from the late 19th- or 20th-century—and give a researched oral presentation about the work’s place in and its contribution to the canon of British music.
  
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    MHMUS 475 — Music in the Americas - A Cross-Cultural Perspective

    3 credits
    Fall
    Edgardo Salinas

    Prerequisite: MHMUS 311  This course explores the music produced in the Americas during the 20th century. It proposes a new cross-cultural perspective that traces contrasts and connections through the music and the shared history of North, Central, and South America. The class is organized around case studies that examine exemplary works and the hemispheric reception of composers such as Gershwin, Copland, Cage, Chavez, Revueltas, Villa-Lobos, Ginastera, Piazzolla, Golijov, and John Adams. The course will also examine popular and folk-music traditions while considering their impact on those composers and on the culture of the Americas at large, including jazz, bossa nova, Tropicalismo, tango, rock, and the “Nueva Canción” movement from Latin America.
  
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    MHMUS 477 — Faust in Music

    3 credits
    Fall
    John J.H. Muller

    Prerequisite: MHMUS 311  The Faust legend was a source of great inspiration for composers of the 19th and 20th centuries. After briefly considering the historical Faust and literary works based on his legend, such as Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus and Goethe’s Faust, we will examine in detail a series of musical treatments, instrumental, operatic, and in between. Compositions will range from a vocal miniature like Schubert’s “Gretchen am Spinnrad’” to Mahler’s monumental 8th Symphony. We will compare how composers have had different responses to the themes of the legend. Were they drawn to the work for its philosophical qualities, the love story, or was it the devil himself who fascinated them? Issues of musical style will be studied. For instance, comparing settings by Berlioz, Schumann, and Liszt demonstrates a diversity of Romantic style. Gounod’s Faust is very much in the tradition of French opera, yet Boito’s Mefistofele sounds nothing like Verdi. Important 20th-century settings include Busoni’s Doktor Faustus and Schnittke’s Historia von D. Johann Fausten, one of his final works. Even Stravinsky was drawn to the subject, in The Rake’s Progress.
  
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    MHMUS 490 — Music and Community

    3 credits
    Spring
    Fredara Hadley

    Prerequisite: MHMUS 311  This course uses ethnomusicological frameworks as a way to explore how musical meaning is constructed. Anchored in the importance of one’s “lived experience,” the material discussed emphasizes the relationship between ethnomusicology and jazz and classical music. Topics include: a historical overview of ethnomusicological theory, the influence of fieldwork as a research method, the relationship between musicians and ethnomusicologists, and the intersecting roles of ethnomusicology in jazz, classical, folk, and popular genres. Students will complete projects anchored in ethnomusicological insights that address both music in which they are a participant and musics with which they are less familiar. 


Music Literature

  
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    MLMUS 101-2 — Organ Literature

    2 credits
    Not Offered 2018-19
    Faculty

    A two-semester survey of the literature for organ, studied in parallel with the constant evolution of the instrument’s tonal and technical design. Emphasis placed on the acquisition of an overarching knowledge of the major styles and periods of this lengthy history, along with the types of compositions that comprise these categories.
  
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    MLMUS 301-2 — Guitar History and Literature

    4 credits
    Not offered for 2016-2017
    Mark Delpriora

    Fall semester: The study of the literature of guitar-related instruments of the Renaissance and Baroque periods, including the vihuela, four-course guitar, Baroque guitar, Baroque lute, theorbo, and archlute. Includes the study of French, Italian, and German tablatures. Through transcription and analysis, students gain the necessary insights to assess the merits of editions of music from these stylistic periods as well as become acquainted with the performance practice and playing techniques on the original instruments of the time.
    Spring semester: A survey of the solo, chamber, and concerto literature of the 18th to the 21st centuries, including the development of the Baroque guitar to the modern classic guitar, the evolution of guitar notation, facsimile editions, playing techniques, and performance practice. The recorded literature will also be discussed. Required of all undergraduate Guitar majors.

Piano Literature

  
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    MLMUS 133-4 — Piano Literature I

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Sharon Levy

    Early keyboard music (through Mozart). An introduction to the repertory of the piano and the history of piano playing, with consideration of the challenges facing the modern pianist. The classes will explore the repertoire and associated performance practice through listening, score, and source study, reading projects, bibliography, and performance. Several workshop sessions will examine the concepts underlying the repertory, provide hands-on introductions to instrumental precursors and successors of the concert grand, and consider issues confronting the young pianists in the class. Required of all undergraduate Piano majors.
  
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    MLMUS 233-4 — Piano Literature II

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Sharon Levy

    19th-century piano music. An introduction to the repertory of the piano and the history of piano playing, with consideration of the challenges facing the modern pianist. The classes will explore the repertoire and associated performance practice through listening, score, and source study, reading projects, bibliography, and performance. Several workshop sessions will examine the concepts underlying the repertory, provide hands-on introductions to instrumental precursors and successors of the concert grand, and consider issues confronting the young pianists in the class. Required of all undergraduate Piano majors.
  
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    MLMUS 333-4 — Piano Literature III

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Aaron Wunsch

    The piano in the 20th and 21st centuries. A survey of the piano repertory and the history of piano playing, with consideration of the challenges facing pianists today. The classes will explore repertoire and associated performance practice through listening, score, and source study; readings; and in-class presentations. Required of all undergraduate Piano majors.
  
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    MLMUS 511 — Juilliard PianoScope

    1 credit per semester
    Fall, Spring
    Aaron Wunsch

    An innovative series of performances and related events based around a theme or composer within the piano repertoire, overseen by the Piano Department. Those registered participate in three components: (1) public performances at Juilliard and the Pierpont Morgan Library, (2) a master class with Juilliard piano faculty, and (3) a four-session classroom course on the specific topic each term.  With permission of piano teacher.

Music Studies

  
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    MSMUS C596-7 — Chamber Music Community Service Seminar

    2 credits per term
    Fall and Spring
    Natasha Brofsky and Cathy Cho

    The Chamber Music Community Engagement Seminar is open to up to four chamber groups committed to a yearlong exploration into harnessing the power of music as an agent for change in our local community. The class meets weekly over the course of the academic year, during which the groups will work with the faculty and invited guests to develop and refine a project of their own choosing. Possible projects include an educational collaboration with a local children’s hospital; a performance series for a rehabilitation center, refugee organization, or homeless shelter located in an underserved community; or a benefit concert for a local environmental agency or other charity of choice, among others. Through these projects, students will use their creative talent and entrepreneurial skills to engage with the local community to achieve social change. Selected by application and interview. 

  
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    MSMUS R303-4 — Composition Practicum

    1 credit
    Full Year
    Faculty

    This seminar for all undergraduate Composition majors concentrates on practical techniques of composition. Composition majors only.
  
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    MSMUS R503-4 — Composers’ Forum

    2 credits
    Full Year
    Robert Beaser

    The Forum is a biweekly meeting of the Composition department at which students present new works to their fellow students and the composition faculty, and composerly concerns are discussed. On occasion, guest speakers are invited to participate. The Forum also sponsors Music by Juilliard Composers, three concerts per semester featuring works by student composers. Required of all Composition majors in each semester of residence.
  
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    MSMUS R513-4 — Organ Performance Class

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Paul Jacobs

    A seminar for Organ majors, in which repertoire, styles of instruments, and performances are related to contemporary performance practices. Every student in the department is expected to perform each week. Required of all Organ majors in each semester of residence.
  
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    MSMUS R531-2 — Guitar Performance Class

    2 credits
    Full Year
    Sharon Isbin

    A master class in which performance techniques and interpretive skills (including Baroque performance practices) are demonstrated and discussed. On occasion, visiting guest artists/lecturers are invited to conduct the class. Required of all Guitar majors in each semester of residence.
  
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    MSMUS R533-4 — Piano Forum


    Full Year
    Piano Faculty

    A departmental practicum where students gain experience in performance, presentation, and professional development through in-class performances, lectures, and master classes with guest artists and Juilliard piano faculty.
  
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    MSMUS 001 — Alexander Technique

    1 credit
    Full Year
    Jane Kosminsky and Lauren Schiff

    A mind-body method for becoming aware of and changing movement habits. Focus is on the development of awareness of oneself in movement — to recognize and learn how to release excess tension and change those habits of movement that interfere with the free and centered use of the body. Strict attendance requirements.
  
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    MSMUS 100 — Piano Topics

    1 credit
    Fall
    Faculty

    A one-semester course designed as an orientation for beginning Piano majors. Topics include the anatomy of the piano, the physiology of the hand, textual cognition, genesis of forms, and editions. Guest speakers and class discussion. Required of all first-year undergraduate Piano majors.
  
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    MSMUS 110 — Piano Performance Class I

    1 credit
    Spring
    Jerome Lowenthal

    Piano majors perform in class repertoire that they are studying with their major teachers.
  
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    MSMUS 141-2 — Fretboard Harmony I

    2 credits
    Not offered for 2016-2017
    Mark Delpriora

    This course includes the study of scale systems (Segovia, Carlevaro, William Leavitt); scales in thirds, sixths, tenths; scales in contrary motion (two voices); bass clef; figured bass (two voices); scales in triads; alto and tenor clef reading; four-part harmony (in root position); and introduction of complex figured basses. Guitar majors only.
  
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    MSMUS 211 — Basics of Conducting

    2 credits
    Fall and Spring
    Jeffrey Milarsky

    Prerequisite: ETMUS 111-2  . Fundamentals of baton technique, principles of interpretations, methods and rehearsal technique. A basic outline of conducting selected repertoire, accompanied by two pianos throughout each semester.  A representative list of scores will be studied from the musical and technical standpoint. This course is designed as in introduction for students who have no prior experience on the podium.  
  
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    MSMUS 221-2 — Piano Performance Class II

    2 credits
    Full Year
    Matti Raekallio

    Piano majors perform in class repertoire that they are studying with their major teachers.
  
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    MSMUS 260 — Composing With Technology

    2 credits
    Fall
    Edward Bilous

    This course will provide composers with the basic tools and techniques needed to create music in a contemporary production environment. Topics of study will include basic acoustics and sound production, sequencing and recording, arranging for electronic instruments, sound editing, signal processing, and mixing. Critically acclaimed recordings of music of various styles and genres will serve as focal points of study. Classwork will include composition assignments, critical listening, and discussions and a long-term creative project. A basic understanding of Mac OS X is required.
  
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    MSMUS 321-2 — Piano Performance Class III

    2 credits
    Full Year
    Julian Martin

    Piano majors perform in class repertoire that they are studying with their major teachers.
  
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    MSMUS 421-2 — Piano Performance Class IV

    2 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty

    Piano majors perform in class repertoire that they are studying with their major teachers.
  
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    MSMUS 500 — Departmental Seminars

    2 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty

    Each department conducts classes, workshops and seminars dealing with the business and practical aspects of managing a career. Guest speakers provide information on such topics as taxes, contracts, auditions, and management. Required of fourth-year undergraduates and first-year graduates who are new to Juilliard.
  
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    MSMUS 505 — Career Development Seminar

    2 credits
    Fall, Spring
    Bärli Nugent

    This highly collaborative seminar comprises three primary areas of focus: the finding and refinement of one’s own artistic voice; the polished production of a wide array of career materials; and the hands-on acquisition of tools and experiences that open pathways to new possibilities. Also woven throughout is increasing the awareness of how to: recognize opportunity; build your team; understand behind-the-scenes thinking; find and commission a composer; walk through a job search; develop an authentic public speaking persona; harness music’s power to effect change; enhance the ability to enter any situation professionally; and take continuous and organic action towards your career right now. Revision and completion of the significant number of weekly assignments is supported by five individual meetings with the teacher during the course of the semester.
  
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    MSMUS 511-2 — Orchestral Conducting (for non-majors)

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Jeffrey Milarsky

    Prerequisite: ETMUS 211-2  . Fundamentals of baton technique, principles of interpretation, methods, and rehearsal technique. A representative list of scores will be studied from the musical and technical standpoint. This course is designed for more advanced musicians. The course culminates with a session conducting the Juilliard Orchestra in the Spring semester. Permission of the instructor required.
  
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    MSMUS 513 — Improvisation

    2 credits
    Fall
    Peter Sykes

    Focusing on one of the most essential skills for any musician, in this introductory course we learn to improvise on our instruments: creating a melody on the spot; developing variations on a given bass or chord progression; learning to modulate; improvising within an ABA or a larger form; playing by ear; experimenting with sound-based free improvisation; combining music with poetry; and more. We improvise mostly in small groups of duos or trios, balancing playing and listening. Open to all instruments and singers. No prior experience in improvisation is needed.​
  
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    MSMUS 519-20 — Composition (for non-majors)

    2 credits per semester
    Fall and Spring
    Philip Lasser

    With permission of the instructor. A course for students with creative ability who show a genuine aptitude for and serious interest in composition. Individualized projects designed to explore compositional issues give way to the writing and discussing of a substantial work per semester culminating in a performance on the course’s Double Vision concert. Students receive individual attention in an open-lesson format.
  
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    MSMUS 531-2 — Orchestration

    6 credits
    Faculty

    Offered in alternate years. A basic introduction to the qualities and capabilities of orchestral instruments. Students analyze representative solo, chamber, and orchestral works, with an emphasis on core repertoire and the historical development of the orchestra. Written exercises are read in class by various small ensembles. Required of all undergraduate Composition majors.
  
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    MSMUS 560 — Introduction to Music Production

    2 credits
    Fall, Spring
    Faculty

    An introduction to the basic skills needed for composing and arranging electronic music. Topics of study include sequencing, sampling, and editing and processing digital audio. Basic Macintosh skills are required.
  
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    MSMUS 573 — Opera Lab Seminar

    2 credits
    Fall
    Cori Ellison

  
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    MSMUS 574 — Opera Lab Practicum

    2 credits
    Spring
    Cori Ellison


Orchestras and Ensembles

  
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    PFENS L511-2 — Juilliard Orchestra

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Faculty and Guest Conductors

    Assignments by the orchestral administration are made on a rotating basis and are primarily determined by audition. Also taken into account are: professionalism, dependability, collegiality, experience level, performance history, and the nature of the event. Required of all full-time students of orchestral instruments in each semester of residence, with the exception of students in the D.M.A. and Artist Diploma programs.
  
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    PFENS L531-2 — Conductors’ Lab Orchestra

    0 credits
    Fall and Spring
    David Robertson & Guest Faculty

    Lab Orchestra provides a weekly workshop for Orchestral Conducting majors to study the standard orchestral literature under the supervision of David Robertson, director of conducting studies and distinguished visiting faculty, and guest faculty. Public performances in Alice Tully Hall on Juilliard’s Wednesdays at One series. Orchestral personnel are paid through the work-study program; services do not satisfy Orchestra credit. Assignment is made by the Lab Orchestra manager. Required of Conducting majors.
  
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    PFENS S511-2 — New Juilliard Ensemble

    1-2 credits per semester
    Fall and Spring
    Joel Sachs

    By audition. The New Juilliard Ensemble (N.J.E.) is a chamber orchestra consisting of 13 to 30 performers offering two concerts each semester that feature works of the last 10 years, along with some rarely performed major compositions of the post-World War II period. Most performances include premieres of works written for the ensemble by composers around the world, as well as by selected Juilliard student composers. Rehearsals are arranged on a project-by-project basis. Participation is voluntary; admission by audition. Participation does not satisfy Orchestra credit.
  
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    PFENS S521-2 — Juilliard Chamber Orchestra

    2 credits per semester
    Fall and Spring
    Faculty and Guests from Orpheus Chamber Orchestra

    The Juilliard Chamber Orchestra, inspired by and modeled on the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, enrolls up to 30 players and is assigned as part of the rotation of orchestra assignments. The ensemble performas standard chamber orchestra repertoire from the Baroque to the 20th century. Professional musicians working in chamber orchestra settings serve as coaches and mentors through the rehearsal process.
  
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    PFENS S531-2 — AXIOM

    1-2 credits per semester
    Fall and Spring
    Jeffrey Milarsky

    By special permission and audition. A chamber ensemble of 15 to 20 players dedicated to the performance of masterworks since 1900. Rehearsals are arranged on a project-by-project basis. Participation is voluntary; admission is by audition. Participation does not satisfy Orchestra credit.
  
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    PFENS S541-2 — Trombone Choir

    2 credits
    Full Year
    Joseph Alessi; John Rojak

    Trombone Choir meets weekly in preparation for annual public performances as well as other related tour and recording projects. Required of all Tenor Trombone and Bass Trombone majors in each semester of residence.

     

     

  
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    PFENS S571-2 — Percussion Ensemble

    4 credits
    Full Year
    Daniel Druckman

    Percussion Ensemble meets twice weekly. Concerts focus on the rich heritage of traditional percussion ensemble literature and newly commissioned works. Other areas explored include orchestral section playing, excerpts/audition preparation, solo performance, and chamber music. Master classes with Juilliard faculty and outside guests are regularly scheduled throughout the semester. Recent guests have included Tim Genis, Dafnis Prieto, Alan Abel, So Percussion, Leigh Howard Stevens, Bob Becker, and Zakir Hussein. Required of all Percussion majors in each semester of residence.

Chamber Music Ensembles

  
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    CMENS H531-2 — Honors Chamber Music

    3 credits per term
    Fall and Spring
    Joseph Lin and chamber music faculty, as assigned

    An intensive yearlong program for piano trios and piano quartets. Participating groups will work with assigned chamber music faculty, are expected to maintain a significant amount of regular rehearsal time, and participate in the Joseph Lin Studio Class. Three required public performances will take place in October, mid-spring semester, and in April. Students will explore their repertoire further through a written, oral, or cross-disciplinary project. Groups will receive priority consideration for placement into Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center master classes, Wednesdays at One concerts in Tully Hall, and other chamber music opportunities. By audition only. 
  
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    CMENS H541-2 — Honors String Quartet

    3 credits per term
    Fall and Spring
    Joseph Lin and chamber music faculty, as assigned

    An intensive yearlong program for string quartets. Participating groups will work with assigned chamber music faculty, are expected to maintain a significant amount of regular rehearsal time, and participate in the Joseph Lin Studio Class. Three required public performances will take place in October, mid-spring semester, and in April. Students will explore their repertoire further through a written, oral or cross-disciplinary project. Groups will receive priority consideration for placement into Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center master classes, Wednesdays at One concerts in Tully Hall, and other chamber music opportunities. By audition only.
  
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    CMENS 141-2 — String Quartet Survey

    2 credits per semester
    Fall and Spring
    Natasha Brofsky, Samuel Rhodes and Laurie Smukler

    This course addresses the fundamentals of technique and artistry in string quartet playing, with a focus on growth as an individual player and as part of a group. Students are carefully matched by audition and scheduled into weekly rehearsal blocks and coaching sessions. By year’s end, each will have performed three complete quartets: one each by Mozart, Haydn and Beethoven. The course includes scheduled weekly rehearsal and coaching times and concludes with the Beethovenathon, an 8-hour marathon concert open to the public. Coached by Ms. Brofsky, Mr. Rhodes and Ms. Smukler. Required of all first-year undergraduate and transfer Violin, Viola and Cello majors. Also offered as an elective to non-first-year undergraduate or transfer Viola and Cello majors, with permission of the director of chamber music.

  
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    CMENS 521-2 — American Brass Quintet Seminar

    2 credits per semester
    Fall and Spring
    American Brass Quintet

    Students are placed in brass quintets by audition and receive weekly coaching. Students also explore brass chamber music topics in seminars and hear guest brass ensembles. Open to all brass majors. One full year required of all undergraduate brass majors.
  
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    CMENS 531-2 — Chamber Music

    2 credits per semester
    Fall, Spring
    Chamber Music Faculty

    Students form their own groups (with the assistance of the Chamber Music office, if needed) and approach the coach of their choice. Students may form piano trios, quartets and quintets; string trios, quintets and sextets; wind quintets; brass quintets; mixed wind and string groups; mixed ensembles with fortepiano; ensembles exploring improvisation; ensembles with voice; ensembles focusing on repertoire by Juilliard composition faculty; duos. 

  
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    CMENS 541-2 — String Quartet

    2 credits per semester
    Fall and Spring
    Chamber Music Faculty

    Students form string quartets and work on repertoire of any era of their own choosing. Coached by chamber music faculty. One full year required of all undergraduate Violin, Viola and Cello majors.

     

  
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    CMENS 561-2 — Two Pianos

    2 credits per semester
    Fall and Spring
    Chamber Music Faculty

    Undergraduate Piano majors may partially satisfy their chamber music requirement with up to one year of duo chamber music, one semester of which may be Two Pianos. Students may form their own two-piano teams to study traditional repertoire for two pianos, coached by chamber music faculty who are not their major teachers.
  
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    CMENS 583-4 — Mixed Ensemble Seminar (MXE)

    2 credits per semester
    Fall, Spring
    Carol Wincenc

     

    Students form mixed ensembles with repertoire focused around harp, guitar and/or double bass with winds, strings and /or piano added as needed. Limited to four ensembles per semester. Coached by Ms. Wincenc. One full year (or two semesters) required of all undergraduate Guitar and Harp majors.

 

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